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Superheroes and third-wave feminism

Superheroes and third-wave feminism
Superheroes and third-wave feminism

Recent developments in superhero comics have seen positive changes to the representation of characters and storylines. In this article, we use examples of the increase in female characters and female-led titles, the swapping of gender from a male character to a female one, and the increase in female writers and artists to investigate how the representation of female characters has evolved. We argue that these changes mark an intervention on behalf of female creators in keeping with the theory and practice of third-wave feminism. We also argue that this evolution provides a good example of how third-wave feminism remains indebted to and continues the important work of second-wave feminism. The article explores the important role of intersectionality alongside themes relating to the body and sexuality, violence, solidarity and equality, and girlhood in comics such as Birds of Prey, Harley Quinn, Ms. Marvel, Captain Marvel, and A-Force.

Third wave feminism, Gender, Superheroes, Comics, Intersectionality, Solidarity, Girl
381-396
Curtis, Neal
38870b01-7bea-4fc5-9e25-82855343c579
Cardo, Valentina
87fafbf1-f6c0-4454-a39a-9173d7bd7f5e
Curtis, Neal
38870b01-7bea-4fc5-9e25-82855343c579
Cardo, Valentina
87fafbf1-f6c0-4454-a39a-9173d7bd7f5e

Curtis, Neal and Cardo, Valentina (2018) Superheroes and third-wave feminism. Feminist Media Studies, 18 (3), 381-396. (doi:10.1080/14680777.2017.1351387).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Recent developments in superhero comics have seen positive changes to the representation of characters and storylines. In this article, we use examples of the increase in female characters and female-led titles, the swapping of gender from a male character to a female one, and the increase in female writers and artists to investigate how the representation of female characters has evolved. We argue that these changes mark an intervention on behalf of female creators in keeping with the theory and practice of third-wave feminism. We also argue that this evolution provides a good example of how third-wave feminism remains indebted to and continues the important work of second-wave feminism. The article explores the important role of intersectionality alongside themes relating to the body and sexuality, violence, solidarity and equality, and girlhood in comics such as Birds of Prey, Harley Quinn, Ms. Marvel, Captain Marvel, and A-Force.

Text
2018 Cardo Curtis Feminist Media Studies - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 12 April 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 24 July 2017
Published date: 4 May 2018
Keywords: Third wave feminism, Gender, Superheroes, Comics, Intersectionality, Solidarity, Girl
Organisations: Graphics, Fine Art & Media

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 410777
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/410777
PURE UUID: c21f5c4d-72ae-4ad4-9ab6-776afc5f6696

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 09 Jun 2017 09:37
Last modified: 03 Dec 2019 06:11

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Contributors

Author: Neal Curtis
Author: Valentina Cardo

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