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Honey is potentially effective in the treatment of atopic dermatitis: clinical and mechanistic studies

Honey is potentially effective in the treatment of atopic dermatitis: clinical and mechanistic studies
Honey is potentially effective in the treatment of atopic dermatitis: clinical and mechanistic studies
Introduction

As manuka honey (MH) exhibits immunoregulatory and anti‐staphylococcal activities, we aimed to investigate if it could be effective in the treatment of atopic dermatitis (AD).

Methods

Adult volunteers with bilateral AD lesions were asked to apply MH on one site overnight for seven consecutive days and leave the contralateral site untreated as possible. Three Item Severity score was used to evaluate the response. Skin swabs were obtained from both sites before and after treatment to investigate the presence of staphylococci and enterotoxin production. In addition, the ability of MH and its methanolic and hexane extracts to down regulate IL4‐induced CCL26 protein release from HaCaT cells was evaluated by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Also, the ability of MH to modulate calcium ionophore‐induced mast cell degranulation was assessed by enzyme immunoassay.

Results

In 14 patients, AD lesions significantly improved post MH treatment versus pre‐treatment as compared to control lesions. No significant changes in the skin staphylococci were observed after day 7, irrespective of honey treatment. Consistent with the clinical observation, MH significantly down regulated IL4‐induced CCL26 release from HaCaT cells in a dose‐dependent manner. This effect was partially lost, though remained significant, when methanolic and hexane extracts of MH were utilized. In addition, mast cell degranulation was significantly inhibited following treatment with MH.

Conclusions

MH is potentially effective in the treatment of AD lesions based on both clinical and cellular studies through different mechanisms. This needs to be confirmed by randomized and controlled clinical trials.
2050-4527
190-199
Alangari, Abdullah A.
f2d7f1fb-6191-44e6-8049-745a62de6e5d
Morris, Keith
0f59ef6c-4954-4239-a7fd-cd9b61da8ffe
El Wilid, Bashir
e7c59131-82ad-4a14-a227-7370e91e3f21
Lau, Laurie
2af8045d-6162-4939-aba7-28dd2f60f6a8
Jones, Ken
e8743619-b38e-4c2b-b322-ecfdc901ac99
Cooper, Rose
e6ae4dbb-c7c7-4dd8-b068-1f0ea1c68085
Jenkins, Rowena
33ec06d6-d03e-4680-8ad0-869e1646cba5
Alangari, Abdullah A.
f2d7f1fb-6191-44e6-8049-745a62de6e5d
Morris, Keith
0f59ef6c-4954-4239-a7fd-cd9b61da8ffe
El Wilid, Bashir
e7c59131-82ad-4a14-a227-7370e91e3f21
Lau, Laurie
2af8045d-6162-4939-aba7-28dd2f60f6a8
Jones, Ken
e8743619-b38e-4c2b-b322-ecfdc901ac99
Cooper, Rose
e6ae4dbb-c7c7-4dd8-b068-1f0ea1c68085
Jenkins, Rowena
33ec06d6-d03e-4680-8ad0-869e1646cba5

Alangari, Abdullah A., Morris, Keith, El Wilid, Bashir, Lau, Laurie, Jones, Ken, Cooper, Rose and Jenkins, Rowena (2017) Honey is potentially effective in the treatment of atopic dermatitis: clinical and mechanistic studies. Immunity, Inflammation and Disease, 5 (2), 190-199. (doi:10.1002/iid3.153).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Introduction

As manuka honey (MH) exhibits immunoregulatory and anti‐staphylococcal activities, we aimed to investigate if it could be effective in the treatment of atopic dermatitis (AD).

Methods

Adult volunteers with bilateral AD lesions were asked to apply MH on one site overnight for seven consecutive days and leave the contralateral site untreated as possible. Three Item Severity score was used to evaluate the response. Skin swabs were obtained from both sites before and after treatment to investigate the presence of staphylococci and enterotoxin production. In addition, the ability of MH and its methanolic and hexane extracts to down regulate IL4‐induced CCL26 protein release from HaCaT cells was evaluated by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Also, the ability of MH to modulate calcium ionophore‐induced mast cell degranulation was assessed by enzyme immunoassay.

Results

In 14 patients, AD lesions significantly improved post MH treatment versus pre‐treatment as compared to control lesions. No significant changes in the skin staphylococci were observed after day 7, irrespective of honey treatment. Consistent with the clinical observation, MH significantly down regulated IL4‐induced CCL26 release from HaCaT cells in a dose‐dependent manner. This effect was partially lost, though remained significant, when methanolic and hexane extracts of MH were utilized. In addition, mast cell degranulation was significantly inhibited following treatment with MH.

Conclusions

MH is potentially effective in the treatment of AD lesions based on both clinical and cellular studies through different mechanisms. This needs to be confirmed by randomized and controlled clinical trials.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 23 January 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 30 March 2017
Organisations: Physical & Rehabilitation Health

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 410858
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/410858
ISSN: 2050-4527
PURE UUID: 2766c29e-4b12-45bb-9e59-74e8edc45686

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 09 Jun 2017 09:47
Last modified: 20 Jun 2018 16:30

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