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The Housing and Planning Act 2016

The Housing and Planning Act 2016
The Housing and Planning Act 2016
In May 2016, the Housing and Planning Act 2016 became law and reflects the first purely Conservative Government intervention on housing in England since the 1990s. This article examines the key provisions of the Act as they pertain to social housing and the government’s stated aim of increasing rates of homeownership in Britain. The Act, through the Starter Homes Scheme, extension of the Right to Buy to Housing Association tenants and changes to security of tenure in the social sector, has been heralded as a ‘landmark’ piece of legislation. This article scrutinises these policy measures and assesses their effectiveness and likely impact. In so doing, it is contended that the 2016 Act exposes the government’s promotion of homeownership above all other housing tenures. This article further explores the deep moralisation at the heart of the homeownership narrative and the intensification in the residualisation of social housing in England which, it is argued, is the inevitable consequence of the reforms.
0026-7961
661-684
Bevan, Chris
cbaf29d8-6ffb-48c1-b4fe-ba4719f6b62b
Laurie, Emma
c1dd220c-d784-4d82-a3ae-c6cdedd48a18
Bevan, Chris
cbaf29d8-6ffb-48c1-b4fe-ba4719f6b62b
Laurie, Emma
c1dd220c-d784-4d82-a3ae-c6cdedd48a18

Bevan, Chris and Laurie, Emma (2017) The Housing and Planning Act 2016. Modern Law Review, 80 (4), 661-684. (doi:10.1111/1468-2230.12278).

Record type: Article

Abstract

In May 2016, the Housing and Planning Act 2016 became law and reflects the first purely Conservative Government intervention on housing in England since the 1990s. This article examines the key provisions of the Act as they pertain to social housing and the government’s stated aim of increasing rates of homeownership in Britain. The Act, through the Starter Homes Scheme, extension of the Right to Buy to Housing Association tenants and changes to security of tenure in the social sector, has been heralded as a ‘landmark’ piece of legislation. This article scrutinises these policy measures and assesses their effectiveness and likely impact. In so doing, it is contended that the 2016 Act exposes the government’s promotion of homeownership above all other housing tenures. This article further explores the deep moralisation at the heart of the homeownership narrative and the intensification in the residualisation of social housing in England which, it is argued, is the inevitable consequence of the reforms.

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Emma Laurie and Chris Bevan MLR amended 10 02 17 - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 19 April 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 13 July 2017
Published date: July 2017
Organisations: Law A

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 411817
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/411817
ISSN: 0026-7961
PURE UUID: c9df271b-0a8f-44ac-ad82-64eb8f0fe2fe
ORCID for Emma Laurie: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2178-1593

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Date deposited: 26 Jun 2017 16:31
Last modified: 09 Jan 2022 07:05

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Contributors

Author: Chris Bevan
Author: Emma Laurie ORCID iD

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