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Up periscope: understanding submarine command and control teamwork during a simulated return to periscope depth

Up periscope: understanding submarine command and control teamwork during a simulated return to periscope depth
Up periscope: understanding submarine command and control teamwork during a simulated return to periscope depth
A submarine is routinely required to return to periscope depth; however, a transition from deep to shallow waters is one the most dangerous operations due to the potential to collide with surface vessels. Submarine operations are not particularly well understood outside the immediate submarine community, particularly from a sociotechnical perspective. A submarine sounds and control room simulator was used to examine the work of ten teams. The Event Analysis of Systematic Teamwork method was used to model the social, task and information networks in order to describe team performance. Results showed that the sonar controller and operations officer are the busiest in the command team. Communication between these operators was revealed as a potential bottleneck in the command team, particularly during higher demand scenarios. The information communicated and tasks completed centred on the processing and understanding of sonar data. Implications are discussed alongside suggestions for future work.
1435-5566
1-19
Stanton, Neville
351a44ab-09a0-422a-a738-01df1fe0fadd
Roberts, Aaron
a2fb35d9-a42f-4a07-848d-01cecae9d893
Fay, Daniel
7db57379-3af4-4554-9358-717ffec9df48
Stanton, Neville
351a44ab-09a0-422a-a738-01df1fe0fadd
Roberts, Aaron
a2fb35d9-a42f-4a07-848d-01cecae9d893
Fay, Daniel
7db57379-3af4-4554-9358-717ffec9df48

Stanton, Neville, Roberts, Aaron and Fay, Daniel (2017) Up periscope: understanding submarine command and control teamwork during a simulated return to periscope depth. Cognition, Technology & Work, 1-19. (doi:10.1007/s10111-017-0413-7).

Record type: Article

Abstract

A submarine is routinely required to return to periscope depth; however, a transition from deep to shallow waters is one the most dangerous operations due to the potential to collide with surface vessels. Submarine operations are not particularly well understood outside the immediate submarine community, particularly from a sociotechnical perspective. A submarine sounds and control room simulator was used to examine the work of ten teams. The Event Analysis of Systematic Teamwork method was used to model the social, task and information networks in order to describe team performance. Results showed that the sonar controller and operations officer are the busiest in the command team. Communication between these operators was revealed as a potential bottleneck in the command team, particularly during higher demand scenarios. The information communicated and tasks completed centred on the processing and understanding of sonar data. Implications are discussed alongside suggestions for future work.

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Up periscope Understanding submarine command and control teamwork during a simulated return to periscope depth - Accepted Manuscript
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10.1007_s10111-017-0413-7 - Version of Record
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 1 June 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 8 June 2017
Organisations: Transportation Group, Southampton Marine & Maritime Institute

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 411938
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/411938
ISSN: 1435-5566
PURE UUID: f0308237-2877-4c17-acca-3aa970952814
ORCID for Neville Stanton: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8562-3279

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 30 Jun 2017 16:30
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 17:13

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