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How far is a long distance? An assessment of the issue of scale in the relationship between limiting long term illness and long distance migration in England and Wales

How far is a long distance? An assessment of the issue of scale in the relationship between limiting long term illness and long distance migration in England and Wales
How far is a long distance? An assessment of the issue of scale in the relationship between limiting long term illness and long distance migration in England and Wales
Research consistently shows that those in poor health are less likely to migrate over long distances, but analyses rarely consider what constitutes a long distance in this context. Additionally, the migration literature often fails to account for place of residence effects on migration behaviour. This paper addresses these issues through analysis on the distance of residential moves by working age adults in the year preceding the 2011 Census. Multilevel logistic regression models predict the odds of having moved long distance relative to short distance, for different definitions of long distance: 10km+, 20km+ and 50km+. We test whether those reporting a Limiting Long Term Illness (LLTI) are less likely to move long distance in all models, controlling for local authority at the time of the 2011 Census. We find no evidence for health-selectivity in long distance migration in the 10 and 20km models, but uncover a significant effect in the 50km model. By age, the odds of having moved long distance do not vary for middle-working age adults (25-54) by LLTI, whilst those with an LLTI in the pre-retirement age group (55-64) are less likely to move long distance in all models. We uncover clusters of local authorities where those with an LLTI are more likely to have moved long distance in the 10km and 20km models, but in the 50km model only two of these areas remain significantly positive. We conclude that health selection in distances moved occurs above a cut-off somewhere between 20km and 50km.
Internal migration, Limiting long term illness, multilevel modelling
1544-8444
Wilding, Sam
1f316b8b-db59-4289-b6aa-183f957f3470
Martin, David
e5c52473-e9f0-4f09-b64c-fa32194b162f
Moon, Graham
68cffc4d-72c1-41e9-b1fa-1570c5f3a0b4
Wilding, Sam
1f316b8b-db59-4289-b6aa-183f957f3470
Martin, David
e5c52473-e9f0-4f09-b64c-fa32194b162f
Moon, Graham
68cffc4d-72c1-41e9-b1fa-1570c5f3a0b4

Wilding, Sam, Martin, David and Moon, Graham (2018) How far is a long distance? An assessment of the issue of scale in the relationship between limiting long term illness and long distance migration in England and Wales. Population, Space and Place. (doi:10.1002/psp.2090).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Research consistently shows that those in poor health are less likely to migrate over long distances, but analyses rarely consider what constitutes a long distance in this context. Additionally, the migration literature often fails to account for place of residence effects on migration behaviour. This paper addresses these issues through analysis on the distance of residential moves by working age adults in the year preceding the 2011 Census. Multilevel logistic regression models predict the odds of having moved long distance relative to short distance, for different definitions of long distance: 10km+, 20km+ and 50km+. We test whether those reporting a Limiting Long Term Illness (LLTI) are less likely to move long distance in all models, controlling for local authority at the time of the 2011 Census. We find no evidence for health-selectivity in long distance migration in the 10 and 20km models, but uncover a significant effect in the 50km model. By age, the odds of having moved long distance do not vary for middle-working age adults (25-54) by LLTI, whilst those with an LLTI in the pre-retirement age group (55-64) are less likely to move long distance in all models. We uncover clusters of local authorities where those with an LLTI are more likely to have moved long distance in the 10km and 20km models, but in the 50km model only two of these areas remain significantly positive. We conclude that health selection in distances moved occurs above a cut-off somewhere between 20km and 50km.

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How far is a long distance? An assessment of the issue of scale in the relationship between limiting long term illness and long distance migration in England and Wales - Accepted Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only until 27 June 2018.
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 27 June 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 30 August 2017
Published date: 6 March 2018
Keywords: Internal migration, Limiting long term illness, multilevel modelling
Organisations: Geography & Environment

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 411951
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/411951
ISSN: 1544-8444
PURE UUID: 2b206bff-5876-4181-b6d1-f9e9b7e02794
ORCID for David Martin: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0397-0769
ORCID for Graham Moon: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7256-8397

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 03 Jul 2017 16:31
Last modified: 18 Jul 2019 11:44

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