The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Scaling up from protected areas in England: the value of establishing large conservation areas

Scaling up from protected areas in England: the value of establishing large conservation areas
Scaling up from protected areas in England: the value of establishing large conservation areas
Protected areas (PAs) are vital for conserving biodiversity, but many PA networks consist of fragmented habitat patches that poorly represent species and ecosystems. One possible solution is to create conservation landscapes that surround and link these PAs. This often involves working with a range of landowners and agencies to develop large-scale conservation initiatives (LSCIs). These initiatives are being championed by both government and civil society, but we lack data on whether such landscape-level approaches overcome the limitations of more traditional PA networks. Here we expand on a previous gap analysis of England to explore to what extent LSCIs improve the representation of different ecoregions, land-cover types and elevation zones compared to the current PA system. Our results show the traditional PA system covers 6.37% of England, an addition of only 0.07% since 2001, and that it is an ecologically unrepresentative network that mostly protects agriculturally unproductive land. Including LSCIs in the analysis increases the land for conservation more than tenfold and reduces these representation biases. However, only 24% of land within LSCIs is currently under conservation management, mostly funded through agri-environment schemes, and limited monitoring data mean that their contribution to conservation objectives is unclear. There is also a considerable spatial overlap between LSCIs, which are managed by different organisations with different conservation objectives. Our analysis is the first to show how Other Effective Area-Based Conservation Measures (OECMs) can increase the representativeness of conservation area networks, and highlights opportunities for increased collaboration between conservation organisations and engagement with landowners.
0006-3207
279-287
Eigenbrod, Felix
43efc6ae-b129-45a2-8a34-e489b5f05827
Clarke, Donna
f5db577c-32e8-400f-8b1c-c7adf8b00e91
Hill, Christopher
8b101c57-b1cf-4c65-af58-7adb48e0183b
Osborne, Patrick
c4d4261d-557c-4179-a24e-cdd7a98fb2b8
Eigenbrod, Felix
43efc6ae-b129-45a2-8a34-e489b5f05827
Clarke, Donna
f5db577c-32e8-400f-8b1c-c7adf8b00e91
Hill, Christopher
8b101c57-b1cf-4c65-af58-7adb48e0183b
Osborne, Patrick
c4d4261d-557c-4179-a24e-cdd7a98fb2b8

Eigenbrod, Felix, Clarke, Donna, Hill, Christopher and Osborne, Patrick (2017) Scaling up from protected areas in England: the value of establishing large conservation areas. Biological Conservation, 279-287. (doi:10.1016/j.biocon.2017.06.016).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Protected areas (PAs) are vital for conserving biodiversity, but many PA networks consist of fragmented habitat patches that poorly represent species and ecosystems. One possible solution is to create conservation landscapes that surround and link these PAs. This often involves working with a range of landowners and agencies to develop large-scale conservation initiatives (LSCIs). These initiatives are being championed by both government and civil society, but we lack data on whether such landscape-level approaches overcome the limitations of more traditional PA networks. Here we expand on a previous gap analysis of England to explore to what extent LSCIs improve the representation of different ecoregions, land-cover types and elevation zones compared to the current PA system. Our results show the traditional PA system covers 6.37% of England, an addition of only 0.07% since 2001, and that it is an ecologically unrepresentative network that mostly protects agriculturally unproductive land. Including LSCIs in the analysis increases the land for conservation more than tenfold and reduces these representation biases. However, only 24% of land within LSCIs is currently under conservation management, mostly funded through agri-environment schemes, and limited monitoring data mean that their contribution to conservation objectives is unclear. There is also a considerable spatial overlap between LSCIs, which are managed by different organisations with different conservation objectives. Our analysis is the first to show how Other Effective Area-Based Conservation Measures (OECMs) can increase the representativeness of conservation area networks, and highlights opportunities for increased collaboration between conservation organisations and engagement with landowners.

Text
Shwartz et al - Scaling up from protected areas_MinorR_Final - Accepted Manuscript
Download (79kB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 16 June 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 29 June 2017
Published date: August 2017

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 412092
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/412092
ISSN: 0006-3207
PURE UUID: f790d8dc-4056-4e95-bfb7-490540db2ab4
ORCID for Felix Eigenbrod: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8982-824X
ORCID for Patrick Osborne: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8919-5710

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 07 Jul 2017 16:31
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 17:15

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×