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Trajectories of multisite musculoskeletal pain and implications for prevention

Trajectories of multisite musculoskeletal pain and implications for prevention
Trajectories of multisite musculoskeletal pain and implications for prevention
Musculoskeletal pain, especially in the back and upper limb, is a major cause of
disability in people of working age. Observational studies have consistently
demonstrated associations with occupational activities such as heavy lifting and
forceful repetitive movements of the wrist and hand, which physically stress relevant anatomical structures. Thus, although there is often no demonstrable underlying injury to tissues that would account for reported symptoms, preventive efforts in the workplace have focused mainly on ergonomic measures designed to reduce mechanical loading. Disappointingly, randomised controlled trials of ergonomic interventions have failed to demonstrate major benefits in the prevention either of low back or upper limb pain, although evidence on the latter is rather sparse. Moreover, research has revealed large international variation in the prevalence of disability from musculoskeletal pain, even among workers with similar jobs, and also major temporal changes within countries that cannot be explained by biomechanical factors. These observations indicate that there must also be other important causes.
1351-0711
465-466
Coggon, David
2b43ce0a-cc61-4d86-b15d-794208ffa5d3
Ntani, Georgia
9b009e0a-5ab2-4c6e-a9fd-15a601e92be5
Coggon, David
2b43ce0a-cc61-4d86-b15d-794208ffa5d3
Ntani, Georgia
9b009e0a-5ab2-4c6e-a9fd-15a601e92be5

Coggon, David and Ntani, Georgia (2017) Trajectories of multisite musculoskeletal pain and implications for prevention. Occupational & Environmental Medicine, 74 (7), 465-466. (doi:10.1136/oemed-2016-104196).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Musculoskeletal pain, especially in the back and upper limb, is a major cause of
disability in people of working age. Observational studies have consistently
demonstrated associations with occupational activities such as heavy lifting and
forceful repetitive movements of the wrist and hand, which physically stress relevant anatomical structures. Thus, although there is often no demonstrable underlying injury to tissues that would account for reported symptoms, preventive efforts in the workplace have focused mainly on ergonomic measures designed to reduce mechanical loading. Disappointingly, randomised controlled trials of ergonomic interventions have failed to demonstrate major benefits in the prevention either of low back or upper limb pain, although evidence on the latter is rather sparse. Moreover, research has revealed large international variation in the prevalence of disability from musculoskeletal pain, even among workers with similar jobs, and also major temporal changes within countries that cannot be explained by biomechanical factors. These observations indicate that there must also be other important causes.

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Accepted/In Press date: 27 January 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 15 March 2017
Published date: 1 July 2017

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 412729
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/412729
ISSN: 1351-0711
PURE UUID: 18395b7e-09de-4872-b825-08a03410088c
ORCID for David Coggon: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1930-3987

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Date deposited: 27 Jul 2017 16:30
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 01:39

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