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Emotional and behaviour difficulties in teenagers with permanent childhood hearing loss

Emotional and behaviour difficulties in teenagers with permanent childhood hearing loss
Emotional and behaviour difficulties in teenagers with permanent childhood hearing loss
Objectives: it is known that during the middle childhood years those with permanent childhood hearing loss (PCHL) are at increased risk of showing emotional and behaviour difficulties (EBD). It has yet to be established whether this risk continues into the late teenage years. There is a paucity of longitudinal studies on the association between PCHL and EBD.

Methods: the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) was used to measure EBD based on parent, teacher and self-ratings in 76 teenagers with PCHL and 38 in a hearing comparison group (HCG) from a population sample of children that was followed up from birth to adolescence.

Results: on parent-rated SDQ, the PCHL group had significantly higher Total Difficulties score than the HCG (Standardised mean difference (SMD) = +0.39, 95% CI 0.00 to 0.79). Amongst the PCHL group the presence of disabilities other than hearing loss had a substantial impact on the level of parent-rated EBD (SMD = +1.68, 1.04 to 2.33). There was a relationship between receptive language ability and EBD in both the HCG (r= -.33, 95%CI -.59 to -.01) and the PCHI group (r = -.33, 95%CI -.53 to -.02). The effect of PCHL on EBD became non-significant when receptive language was included as a covariate (F=0.12, df = 1,95, p=.729). Early confirmation of hearing loss (i.e. before 9 months of age) did not have a significant effect on EBD scores (SMD = +0.31, 95%CI -0.15 to 0.77).

Conclusions: PCHL continues to be associated with elevated EBD scores as measured by parent rated SDQ into the late teenage years but the degree of this elevation is less than in childhood and is not apparent on teacher or self-ratings. Poor receptive language ability appeared to account for these elevated EBD scores in the group with PCHL. Particular attention needs to be paid to the mental health of children and adolescents with PCHL that is accompanied by other disabilities and to those with poor receptive language ability. However, the majority of teenagers with PCHL do not show clinically significant elevated levels of EBD.
0165-5876
186-195
Stevenson, James
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Pimperton, Hannah
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Kreppner, Jana
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Worsfold, Sarah
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Terlektsi, Emmanouela
afe028bf-071f-46ca-bb8c-9a79f0018871
Kennedy, Colin
7c3aff62-0a86-4b44-b7d7-4bc01f23ec93
Stevenson, James
0c85d29b-d294-43cb-ab8d-75e4737478e1
Pimperton, Hannah
705a9281-403e-4b1a-8de3-d46bf8f0a30a
Kreppner, Jana
6a5f447e-1cfe-4654-95b4-e6f89b0275d6
Worsfold, Sarah
9e3f6aa2-8c17-4965-adf4-b3bc1d04ab54
Terlektsi, Emmanouela
afe028bf-071f-46ca-bb8c-9a79f0018871
Kennedy, Colin
7c3aff62-0a86-4b44-b7d7-4bc01f23ec93

Stevenson, James, Pimperton, Hannah, Kreppner, Jana, Worsfold, Sarah, Terlektsi, Emmanouela and Kennedy, Colin (2017) Emotional and behaviour difficulties in teenagers with permanent childhood hearing loss. International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, 101, 186-195. (doi:10.1016/j.ijporl.2017.07.031).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objectives: it is known that during the middle childhood years those with permanent childhood hearing loss (PCHL) are at increased risk of showing emotional and behaviour difficulties (EBD). It has yet to be established whether this risk continues into the late teenage years. There is a paucity of longitudinal studies on the association between PCHL and EBD.

Methods: the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) was used to measure EBD based on parent, teacher and self-ratings in 76 teenagers with PCHL and 38 in a hearing comparison group (HCG) from a population sample of children that was followed up from birth to adolescence.

Results: on parent-rated SDQ, the PCHL group had significantly higher Total Difficulties score than the HCG (Standardised mean difference (SMD) = +0.39, 95% CI 0.00 to 0.79). Amongst the PCHL group the presence of disabilities other than hearing loss had a substantial impact on the level of parent-rated EBD (SMD = +1.68, 1.04 to 2.33). There was a relationship between receptive language ability and EBD in both the HCG (r= -.33, 95%CI -.59 to -.01) and the PCHI group (r = -.33, 95%CI -.53 to -.02). The effect of PCHL on EBD became non-significant when receptive language was included as a covariate (F=0.12, df = 1,95, p=.729). Early confirmation of hearing loss (i.e. before 9 months of age) did not have a significant effect on EBD scores (SMD = +0.31, 95%CI -0.15 to 0.77).

Conclusions: PCHL continues to be associated with elevated EBD scores as measured by parent rated SDQ into the late teenage years but the degree of this elevation is less than in childhood and is not apparent on teacher or self-ratings. Poor receptive language ability appeared to account for these elevated EBD scores in the group with PCHL. Particular attention needs to be paid to the mental health of children and adolescents with PCHL that is accompanied by other disabilities and to those with poor receptive language ability. However, the majority of teenagers with PCHL do not show clinically significant elevated levels of EBD.

Text
Stevenson et al IJPO ACCEPTED VERSION 20 July 2017 - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 21 July 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 25 July 2017
Published date: October 2017

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 412738
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/412738
ISSN: 0165-5876
PURE UUID: ad3ce483-5975-4112-a6ac-cf5d8c6cc5d2
ORCID for Jana Kreppner: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3527-9083

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Date deposited: 28 Jul 2017 16:30
Last modified: 03 Dec 2019 05:58

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