The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Is rapid urbanisation exacerbating wealth-related urban inequalities in child nutritional status? Evidence from least developed countries

Is rapid urbanisation exacerbating wealth-related urban inequalities in child nutritional status? Evidence from least developed countries
Is rapid urbanisation exacerbating wealth-related urban inequalities in child nutritional status? Evidence from least developed countries
Limited evidence exists regarding the extent of wealth-related urban inequalities in nutritional outcomes presumably attributable to the rapid pace of urbanisation. The present study has four inter-related objectives. First, it investigates whether there is a difference in the extent of wealth-related urban inequalities between the most rapidly and less rapidly urbanising countries and whether and to what degree parents’ education exacerbates these inequalities. Furthermore, the study examines the nature and strength of the associations between mother’s socio-economic status and child nutrition and between low birth weight and child nutrition in the selected countries. Data are drawn from the recent Demographic and Health Surveys conducted during 2005–2011. The analysis considered inequality measures, such as concentration indices and concentration curves, and logistic regression modelling. Results show significant inequalities in children’s nutritional outcomes, and that these inequalities are greater in the most rapidly urbanising countries and exacerbated by parents’ poor education. The results further confirm that mother’s socio-economic status and child birth weight are significantly associated with child nutritional outcomes, albeit the former are particularly important in the most rapidly urbanising LDCs. The findings call for a renewed focus on inclusive urban development in poorest countries.
0957-8811
Szabo, Sylvia
01d6bb83-2775-4470-aa2b-b6afbf936187
Padmadas, Sabu
64b6ab89-152b-48a3-838b-e9167964b508
Falkingham, Jane
8df36615-1547-4a6d-ad55-aa9496e85519
Szabo, Sylvia
01d6bb83-2775-4470-aa2b-b6afbf936187
Padmadas, Sabu
64b6ab89-152b-48a3-838b-e9167964b508
Falkingham, Jane
8df36615-1547-4a6d-ad55-aa9496e85519

Szabo, Sylvia, Padmadas, Sabu and Falkingham, Jane (2017) Is rapid urbanisation exacerbating wealth-related urban inequalities in child nutritional status? Evidence from least developed countries. The European Journal of Development Research. (doi:10.1057/s41287-017-0089-0).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Limited evidence exists regarding the extent of wealth-related urban inequalities in nutritional outcomes presumably attributable to the rapid pace of urbanisation. The present study has four inter-related objectives. First, it investigates whether there is a difference in the extent of wealth-related urban inequalities between the most rapidly and less rapidly urbanising countries and whether and to what degree parents’ education exacerbates these inequalities. Furthermore, the study examines the nature and strength of the associations between mother’s socio-economic status and child nutrition and between low birth weight and child nutrition in the selected countries. Data are drawn from the recent Demographic and Health Surveys conducted during 2005–2011. The analysis considered inequality measures, such as concentration indices and concentration curves, and logistic regression modelling. Results show significant inequalities in children’s nutritional outcomes, and that these inequalities are greater in the most rapidly urbanising countries and exacerbated by parents’ poor education. The results further confirm that mother’s socio-economic status and child birth weight are significantly associated with child nutritional outcomes, albeit the former are particularly important in the most rapidly urbanising LDCs. The findings call for a renewed focus on inclusive urban development in poorest countries.

Text
EJDR-2015-0173-REG.R2 - Accepted Manuscript
Download (270kB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 14 May 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 6 July 2017

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 412900
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/412900
ISSN: 0957-8811
PURE UUID: bfbf7b3d-e812-4bae-afe0-e0ae641e5907
ORCID for Sabu Padmadas: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6538-9374
ORCID for Jane Falkingham: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7135-5875

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 07 Aug 2017 16:31
Last modified: 17 Dec 2019 06:00

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×