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A comparative experimental approach to ecotoxicology in shallow-water and deep-sea holothurians suggests similar behavioural responses

A comparative experimental approach to ecotoxicology in shallow-water and deep-sea holothurians suggests similar behavioural responses
A comparative experimental approach to ecotoxicology in shallow-water and deep-sea holothurians suggests similar behavioural responses
Exploration of deep-sea mineral resources is burgeoning, raising concerns regarding ecotoxicological impacts on deep-sea fauna. Assessing toxicity in deep-sea species is technologically challenging, which promotes interest in establishing shallow-water ecotoxicological proxy species. However, the effects of temperature and hydrostatic pressure on toxicity, and how adaptation to deep-sea environmental conditions might moderate these effects, are unknown. To address these uncertainties we assessed behavioural and physiological (antioxidant enzyme activity) responses to exposure to copper-spiked artificial sediments in a laboratory experiment using a shallow-water holothurian (Holothuria forskali), and in an in situ experiment using a deep-sea holothurian (Amperima sp.). Both species demonstrated sustained avoidance behaviour, evading contact with contaminated artificial sediment. However, A. sp. demonstrated sustained avoidance of 5 mg l−1 copper-contaminated artificial sediment whereas H. forskali demonstrated only temporary avoidance of 5 mg l−1 copper-contaminated artificial sediment, suggesting that H. forskali may be more tolerant of metal exposure over 96 h. Nonetheless, the acute behavioural response appears consistent between the shallow-water species and the deep-sea species, suggesting that H. forskali may be a suitable ecotoxicological proxy for A. sp. in acute (≤24 h) exposures which may be representative of deep-sea mining impacts. No antioxidant response was observed in either species, which was interpreted to be the consequence of avoiding copper exposure. Although these data suggest that shallow-water taxa may be suitable ecotoxicological proxies for deep-taxa, differences in methodological and analytical approaches, and in sex and reproductive stage of experimental subjects, require caution in assessing the suitability of H. forskali as an ecotoxicological proxy for A. sp. Nonetheless, avoidance behaviour may have bioenergetic consequences that affect growth and/or reproductive output, potentially impacting fecundity and/or offspring fitness, and thus influencing source-sink dynamics and persistence of wider deep-sea populations.
0166-445X
10-16
Brown, Alastair
909f34db-bc9c-403f-ba8f-31aee1c00161
Wright, Roseanna
3b3ea8d7-ec87-4c73-9a40-68621b32268e
Mevenkamp, Lisa
46c50979-4e34-4721-b9a6-b36a5bb77eb8
Hauton, Chris
7706f6ba-4497-42b2-8c6d-00df81676331
Brown, Alastair
909f34db-bc9c-403f-ba8f-31aee1c00161
Wright, Roseanna
3b3ea8d7-ec87-4c73-9a40-68621b32268e
Mevenkamp, Lisa
46c50979-4e34-4721-b9a6-b36a5bb77eb8
Hauton, Chris
7706f6ba-4497-42b2-8c6d-00df81676331

Brown, Alastair, Wright, Roseanna, Mevenkamp, Lisa and Hauton, Chris (2017) A comparative experimental approach to ecotoxicology in shallow-water and deep-sea holothurians suggests similar behavioural responses. Aquatic Toxicology, 191, 10-16. (doi:10.1016/j.aquatox.2017.06.028).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Exploration of deep-sea mineral resources is burgeoning, raising concerns regarding ecotoxicological impacts on deep-sea fauna. Assessing toxicity in deep-sea species is technologically challenging, which promotes interest in establishing shallow-water ecotoxicological proxy species. However, the effects of temperature and hydrostatic pressure on toxicity, and how adaptation to deep-sea environmental conditions might moderate these effects, are unknown. To address these uncertainties we assessed behavioural and physiological (antioxidant enzyme activity) responses to exposure to copper-spiked artificial sediments in a laboratory experiment using a shallow-water holothurian (Holothuria forskali), and in an in situ experiment using a deep-sea holothurian (Amperima sp.). Both species demonstrated sustained avoidance behaviour, evading contact with contaminated artificial sediment. However, A. sp. demonstrated sustained avoidance of 5 mg l−1 copper-contaminated artificial sediment whereas H. forskali demonstrated only temporary avoidance of 5 mg l−1 copper-contaminated artificial sediment, suggesting that H. forskali may be more tolerant of metal exposure over 96 h. Nonetheless, the acute behavioural response appears consistent between the shallow-water species and the deep-sea species, suggesting that H. forskali may be a suitable ecotoxicological proxy for A. sp. in acute (≤24 h) exposures which may be representative of deep-sea mining impacts. No antioxidant response was observed in either species, which was interpreted to be the consequence of avoiding copper exposure. Although these data suggest that shallow-water taxa may be suitable ecotoxicological proxies for deep-taxa, differences in methodological and analytical approaches, and in sex and reproductive stage of experimental subjects, require caution in assessing the suitability of H. forskali as an ecotoxicological proxy for A. sp. Nonetheless, avoidance behaviour may have bioenergetic consequences that affect growth and/or reproductive output, potentially impacting fecundity and/or offspring fitness, and thus influencing source-sink dynamics and persistence of wider deep-sea populations.

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Brown&al._Aqua_Toxicol_17_accepted - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 25 June 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 27 June 2017
Published date: 1 October 2017

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 413178
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/413178
ISSN: 0166-445X
PURE UUID: b5d16733-d762-4034-8ac5-657571d5dadd
ORCID for Chris Hauton: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2313-4226

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Date deposited: 17 Aug 2017 16:30
Last modified: 15 Aug 2019 04:41

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