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‘Well, it literally stops me from having a life when it’s really bad’: a nested qualitative interview study of patient views on the use of self-management treatments for the management of recurrent sinusitis (SNIFS trial)

‘Well, it literally stops me from having a life when it’s really bad’: a nested qualitative interview study of patient views on the use of self-management treatments for the management of recurrent sinusitis (SNIFS trial)
‘Well, it literally stops me from having a life when it’s really bad’: a nested qualitative interview study of patient views on the use of self-management treatments for the management of recurrent sinusitis (SNIFS trial)
Objective: To explore the experience and perceptions of illness, the decision to consult a GP and the use of self-management approaches for chronic or recurrent sinusitis.
Design: Qualitative semi-structured interview study.
Setting: UK Primary care.
Participants: 32 participants who had been participating in the ‘SNIFS’ (Steam-inhalation-and- Nasal-Irrigation-For-recurrent-Sinusitis) trial in the South of England.
Method: Thematic analysis of semi-structured, telephone interviews.
Results: Participants often reported dramatic impact on both activities and their quality of life. Participants were aware of both antibiotic side effects and resistance, but if they had previously been prescribed antibiotics, many patients believed that they would be necessary for the future treatment of sinusitis. Participants used self-help treatments for short and limited periods of time only. In the context of the trial, steam inhalation used for recurrent sinusitis was described as acceptable, but is seen as having limited effectiveness. Nasal irrigation was viewed as acceptable and beneficial by more patients. However, some participants reported that they would not use the treatment again due to the uncomfortable side-effects they experienced, which outweighed any symptom relief which may have resulted had they continued.
Conclusions: Steam inhalation is acceptable but seen as having limited effectiveness. Nasal irrigation is generally acceptable and beneficial for symptoms, but detailed information on the correct procedure and potential benefits of persisting may increase acceptability and adherence in those patients who find it uncomfortable.
2044-6055
Leydon, Geraldine
c5cdaff5-0fa1-4d38-b575-b97c2892ec40
Thomas, Tammy
742fc3b2-61cb-4f87-8466-afa31b3c8d8e
McDermott, Lisa
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Halls, Amy
75f2a817-41cf-4283-8276-2088d7d27429
Holdstock-Brown, Ben
5862cf7e-72bb-4925-b02e-2e19c73ab549
Petley, Stephen
c7ec3858-e138-4536-bd6e-f51504dae2f9
Wiseman, Clare
881bae72-3be3-4efc-990d-5c7b8bb54a82
Little, Paul
1bf2d1f7-200c-47a5-ab16-fe5a8756a777
Leydon, Geraldine
c5cdaff5-0fa1-4d38-b575-b97c2892ec40
Thomas, Tammy
742fc3b2-61cb-4f87-8466-afa31b3c8d8e
McDermott, Lisa
10aa4fe3-7260-4080-8f8b-7c14b3ca409e
Halls, Amy
75f2a817-41cf-4283-8276-2088d7d27429
Holdstock-Brown, Ben
5862cf7e-72bb-4925-b02e-2e19c73ab549
Petley, Stephen
c7ec3858-e138-4536-bd6e-f51504dae2f9
Wiseman, Clare
881bae72-3be3-4efc-990d-5c7b8bb54a82
Little, Paul
1bf2d1f7-200c-47a5-ab16-fe5a8756a777

Leydon, Geraldine, Thomas, Tammy, McDermott, Lisa, Halls, Amy, Holdstock-Brown, Ben, Petley, Stephen, Wiseman, Clare and Little, Paul (2017) ‘Well, it literally stops me from having a life when it’s really bad’: a nested qualitative interview study of patient views on the use of self-management treatments for the management of recurrent sinusitis (SNIFS trial). BMJ Open, [e017130]. (doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2017-017130).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objective: To explore the experience and perceptions of illness, the decision to consult a GP and the use of self-management approaches for chronic or recurrent sinusitis.
Design: Qualitative semi-structured interview study.
Setting: UK Primary care.
Participants: 32 participants who had been participating in the ‘SNIFS’ (Steam-inhalation-and- Nasal-Irrigation-For-recurrent-Sinusitis) trial in the South of England.
Method: Thematic analysis of semi-structured, telephone interviews.
Results: Participants often reported dramatic impact on both activities and their quality of life. Participants were aware of both antibiotic side effects and resistance, but if they had previously been prescribed antibiotics, many patients believed that they would be necessary for the future treatment of sinusitis. Participants used self-help treatments for short and limited periods of time only. In the context of the trial, steam inhalation used for recurrent sinusitis was described as acceptable, but is seen as having limited effectiveness. Nasal irrigation was viewed as acceptable and beneficial by more patients. However, some participants reported that they would not use the treatment again due to the uncomfortable side-effects they experienced, which outweighed any symptom relief which may have resulted had they continued.
Conclusions: Steam inhalation is acceptable but seen as having limited effectiveness. Nasal irrigation is generally acceptable and beneficial for symptoms, but detailed information on the correct procedure and potential benefits of persisting may increase acceptability and adherence in those patients who find it uncomfortable.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 17 July 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 3 November 2017

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 413440
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/413440
ISSN: 2044-6055
PURE UUID: 87271f9c-25aa-426d-a5ec-d5b6c746b0cf
ORCID for Geraldine Leydon: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5986-3300

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Date deposited: 24 Aug 2017 16:30
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 01:51

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