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Quantifying the Influence of Aspect Ratio on Window Failure when Subject to Long-duration Blast Loading

Quantifying the Influence of Aspect Ratio on Window Failure when Subject to Long-duration Blast Loading
Quantifying the Influence of Aspect Ratio on Window Failure when Subject to Long-duration Blast Loading
Windows differ vastly in size and shape, even for a single building. Analysis of post-explosion photographs shows that aspect ratio can have a significant effect on the survival of a window. While new constructions use laminated glass to mitigate damage, many older buildings still contain more fragile annealed glass. In the United Kingdom, 4mm-thick annealed glass represents the minimum specification for windows and therefore the worst damage case. This paper reports on the effect of window aspect ratio on the failure characteristics of annealed glass subjected to long-duration planar blast waves. Long-duration blasts are typically defined by a positive phase duration greater than 100ms, observed in the far field of large explosions which produce large impulses. The air blast tunnel (ABT) at MOD Shoeburyness is a unique testing facility capable of simulating pressure regimes observed in long-duration blast events. In a series of eight full-scale trials in the ABT, sixteen 4mm-thick annealed glass windows were examined. Four different aspect ratios, from 1:1 to 1:2, were considered. High-speed photography captured glass response while fibre-optic controlled instrumentation recorded full incident and reflected pressure histories. Results from the experimental study demonstrate that aspect ratio significantly influences the break time and crack propagation in glass panels.
Monk, Sarah
a18cade9-7524-41d0-9fda-b80786054c46
Clubley, Simon
d3217801-61eb-480d-a6a7-5873b5f6f0fd
Monk, Sarah
a18cade9-7524-41d0-9fda-b80786054c46
Clubley, Simon
d3217801-61eb-480d-a6a7-5873b5f6f0fd

Monk, Sarah and Clubley, Simon (2017) Quantifying the Influence of Aspect Ratio on Window Failure when Subject to Long-duration Blast Loading. 17th International Symposium for the Interaction of the Effects of Munitions with Structures, Bad Neuenahr, Germany. 16 - 20 Oct 2017.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Windows differ vastly in size and shape, even for a single building. Analysis of post-explosion photographs shows that aspect ratio can have a significant effect on the survival of a window. While new constructions use laminated glass to mitigate damage, many older buildings still contain more fragile annealed glass. In the United Kingdom, 4mm-thick annealed glass represents the minimum specification for windows and therefore the worst damage case. This paper reports on the effect of window aspect ratio on the failure characteristics of annealed glass subjected to long-duration planar blast waves. Long-duration blasts are typically defined by a positive phase duration greater than 100ms, observed in the far field of large explosions which produce large impulses. The air blast tunnel (ABT) at MOD Shoeburyness is a unique testing facility capable of simulating pressure regimes observed in long-duration blast events. In a series of eight full-scale trials in the ABT, sixteen 4mm-thick annealed glass windows were examined. Four different aspect ratios, from 1:1 to 1:2, were considered. High-speed photography captured glass response while fibre-optic controlled instrumentation recorded full incident and reflected pressure histories. Results from the experimental study demonstrate that aspect ratio significantly influences the break time and crack propagation in glass panels.

Text
ISIEMS Paper UoS Sarah Monk_Simon Clubley - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 2 September 2017
Published date: 16 October 2017
Venue - Dates: 17th International Symposium for the Interaction of the Effects of Munitions with Structures, Bad Neuenahr, Germany, 2017-10-16 - 2017-10-20

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 413793
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/413793
PURE UUID: a1342fe6-637f-43eb-880c-71bb00acb154
ORCID for Sarah Monk: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0407-1493
ORCID for Simon Clubley: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3779-242X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 06 Sep 2017 16:31
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 05:18

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