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Deliberative bureaucracy: reconciling democracy's trade-off between inclusion and economy

Deliberative bureaucracy: reconciling democracy's trade-off between inclusion and economy
Deliberative bureaucracy: reconciling democracy's trade-off between inclusion and economy
Deliberative democrats have long considered the trade-off between norms of inclusion and efficiency. The latest attempt at reconciliation is the deliberative systems model, which situates and links individual sites of deliberation in their macro context. Yet, critics argue that this move to scale up leaves inclusive practices of citizen deliberation vulnerable. Here, we seek to mitigate these concerns via an unlikely source: bureaucracy. Drawing on the notion of policy feedback, with its attendant focus on how policies (re)make democratic politics, we envision a deliberative bureaucracy where implementation and service delivery are imbued with norms of justification, publicity and, most radically, inclusion. Looking at promising contemporary governance practices, we argue that a deliberative bureaucracy, with the rich public encounters it might foster, can reconcile the desire to scale up deliberative democracy to whole systems with the desire to hold on to the benefits of scaled-down citizen deliberation.
deliberative systems, deliberative democracy, bureaucracy, public administration, policy feedback
0032-3217
Boswell, John
34bad0df-3d4d-40ce-948f-65871e3d783c
Corbett, Jack
ad651655-ac70-4072-a36f-92165e296ce2
Boswell, John
34bad0df-3d4d-40ce-948f-65871e3d783c
Corbett, Jack
ad651655-ac70-4072-a36f-92165e296ce2

Boswell, John and Corbett, Jack (2017) Deliberative bureaucracy: reconciling democracy's trade-off between inclusion and economy. Political Studies. (doi:10.1177/0032321717723512).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Deliberative democrats have long considered the trade-off between norms of inclusion and efficiency. The latest attempt at reconciliation is the deliberative systems model, which situates and links individual sites of deliberation in their macro context. Yet, critics argue that this move to scale up leaves inclusive practices of citizen deliberation vulnerable. Here, we seek to mitigate these concerns via an unlikely source: bureaucracy. Drawing on the notion of policy feedback, with its attendant focus on how policies (re)make democratic politics, we envision a deliberative bureaucracy where implementation and service delivery are imbued with norms of justification, publicity and, most radically, inclusion. Looking at promising contemporary governance practices, we argue that a deliberative bureaucracy, with the rich public encounters it might foster, can reconcile the desire to scale up deliberative democracy to whole systems with the desire to hold on to the benefits of scaled-down citizen deliberation.

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Deliberative_Bureaucracy - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 7 July 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 2 October 2017
Keywords: deliberative systems, deliberative democracy, bureaucracy, public administration, policy feedback

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 413873
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/413873
ISSN: 0032-3217
PURE UUID: 37b0b641-e16d-4fd0-99e3-45667efd65ae
ORCID for John Boswell: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3018-8791
ORCID for Jack Corbett: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2005-7162

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Date deposited: 08 Sep 2017 16:30
Last modified: 20 Mar 2020 01:33

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