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The undergraduate self-perception of employability: Human capital, careers advice, and career ownership

The undergraduate self-perception of employability: Human capital, careers advice, and career ownership
The undergraduate self-perception of employability: Human capital, careers advice, and career ownership
This study focuses on the undergraduate self-perception of employability. We aimed to explore the impact of human capital, which incorporates social capital, cultural capital, psychological capital, scholastic capital, market-value capital, and skills. We also examined the role of careers advice and career ownership (protean career). Additionally, moderators of gender, degree subject, and year of study offer further contribution. Running a two-wave study (Model I) and a cross-sectional study (Model II) of undergraduates at a UK university, our findings draw on 387 students. Findings indicate that human capital, careers advice, and career ownership are important components of self-perceived employability. The study advances human capital theory and contemporary career theory at the transition from higher education into the labour market. Through advancing understanding of the undergraduate self-perception of employability, all stakeholders may benefit, via better-informed strategies for preparing, attracting, hiring, and retaining graduates.
Employability, human capital, protean career, career management, conceputal model
0307-5079
599-614
Donald, William, Edward
81d72127-3ea4-463b-814b-b7863462041a
Baruch, Yehuda
25b89777-def4-4958-afdc-0ceab43efe8a
Ashleigh, Melanie
f2a64ca7-435b-4ad7-8db5-33b735766e46
Donald, William, Edward
81d72127-3ea4-463b-814b-b7863462041a
Baruch, Yehuda
25b89777-def4-4958-afdc-0ceab43efe8a
Ashleigh, Melanie
f2a64ca7-435b-4ad7-8db5-33b735766e46

Donald, William, Edward, Baruch, Yehuda and Ashleigh, Melanie (2019) The undergraduate self-perception of employability: Human capital, careers advice, and career ownership. Studies in Higher Education, 44 (4), 599-614. (doi:10.1080/03075079.2017.1387107).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This study focuses on the undergraduate self-perception of employability. We aimed to explore the impact of human capital, which incorporates social capital, cultural capital, psychological capital, scholastic capital, market-value capital, and skills. We also examined the role of careers advice and career ownership (protean career). Additionally, moderators of gender, degree subject, and year of study offer further contribution. Running a two-wave study (Model I) and a cross-sectional study (Model II) of undergraduates at a UK university, our findings draw on 387 students. Findings indicate that human capital, careers advice, and career ownership are important components of self-perceived employability. The study advances human capital theory and contemporary career theory at the transition from higher education into the labour market. Through advancing understanding of the undergraduate self-perception of employability, all stakeholders may benefit, via better-informed strategies for preparing, attracting, hiring, and retaining graduates.

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WD et al Studies in Higher Education 2017 Proof Corrections - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 22 September 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 10 October 2017
Published date: 3 April 2019
Keywords: Employability, human capital, protean career, career management, conceputal model

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 414294
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/414294
ISSN: 0307-5079
PURE UUID: e48e3cda-9051-4cce-bac1-512dbcf6d995
ORCID for Yehuda Baruch: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0678-6273
ORCID for Melanie Ashleigh: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0583-0922

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 26 Sep 2017 16:30
Last modified: 27 Jan 2020 13:46

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