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The rise of resilience after the financial crises: a case of neoliberalism rebooted?

The rise of resilience after the financial crises: a case of neoliberalism rebooted?
The rise of resilience after the financial crises: a case of neoliberalism rebooted?
This article critically examines recent works on resilience. In so doing, it argues that rather than representing some radical rupture with current practices heralding the dawn of a new era, as David Chandler claims, the emphasis on individuals as resilient subjects simply represents a new phase inthe neoliberal shift from the state as provider to state as enabler and promoter of self-reliance. Indeed, our present preoccupation with complexity, uncertainty, and resilience can best be understood as reflecting the consequences of neoliberal policies Moreover, the article further argues that there is an attendant danger that resilience thinking may further promote neoliberal forms of governmentality and encourage a degree of political passivity. The emphasis on resilience is in danger of depoliticising highly political choices, shifting attention toward ex-post policies of survival and recovery rather than challenging the current economic order and resisting the further imposition of neoliberal policies on already beleaguered populations. This article therefore argues for shifting our emphasis towards a Foucauldian analysis of power and resistance.
0260-2105
193-214
Mckeown, Anthony
7d1987a3-0b14-43fb-bdd8-ebbfd9c99bd5
Glenn, John
d843e423-d1f9-4be5-b667-8e44a42efff2
Mckeown, Anthony
7d1987a3-0b14-43fb-bdd8-ebbfd9c99bd5
Glenn, John
d843e423-d1f9-4be5-b667-8e44a42efff2

Mckeown, Anthony and Glenn, John (2018) The rise of resilience after the financial crises: a case of neoliberalism rebooted? Review of International Studies, 44 (2), 193-214. (doi:10.1017/S0260210517000493).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This article critically examines recent works on resilience. In so doing, it argues that rather than representing some radical rupture with current practices heralding the dawn of a new era, as David Chandler claims, the emphasis on individuals as resilient subjects simply represents a new phase inthe neoliberal shift from the state as provider to state as enabler and promoter of self-reliance. Indeed, our present preoccupation with complexity, uncertainty, and resilience can best be understood as reflecting the consequences of neoliberal policies Moreover, the article further argues that there is an attendant danger that resilience thinking may further promote neoliberal forms of governmentality and encourage a degree of political passivity. The emphasis on resilience is in danger of depoliticising highly political choices, shifting attention toward ex-post policies of survival and recovery rather than challenging the current economic order and resisting the further imposition of neoliberal policies on already beleaguered populations. This article therefore argues for shifting our emphasis towards a Foucauldian analysis of power and resistance.

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Resilience_Accepted_Review of International Studies - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 11 August 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 27 October 2017
Published date: 1 April 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 414808
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/414808
ISSN: 0260-2105
PURE UUID: b198c8d5-209d-42c8-a663-36dd15c1e068
ORCID for John Glenn: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9694-8282

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Date deposited: 11 Oct 2017 16:31
Last modified: 27 Apr 2022 05:37

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Contributors

Author: Anthony Mckeown
Author: John Glenn ORCID iD

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