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Understanding window behaviour in a mixed-mode buildings and the impact on energy performance

Understanding window behaviour in a mixed-mode buildings and the impact on energy performance
Understanding window behaviour in a mixed-mode buildings and the impact on energy performance
Studies have shown that people feel more comfortable when they can control the environment in which they live and work. In a mixed-mode office building, this control is usually through openable windows, but window opening behaviour can have a significant impact on building energy performance. This monitoring study investigated window behaviours in a mixed-mode office building during the summer of 2016 in Southampton. Applying a mixed methods approach, 31 windows and 10 offices doors, movements were monitored using accelerometers. Concurrently indoor and outdoor environments were monitored and occupants' surveys undertaken. Results show a statistical relationship between window opening behaviour and indoor ambient and radiant temperature and CO2 levels. The reasons for opening a window temperature and humidity as reported from the occupant’s survey. Observed patterns of window opening behaviour did not match the building’s design strategy as users acted differently from what BMS advised. This will have a substantial impact on energy performance in summer.
Window behaviour, Energy performance gap, Mixed-mode buildings, Mixed-method approach, Longitudinal analysis
Giakoumis, George
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Gauthier, Stephanie
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Giakoumis, George
be0d04ee-a3d4-4318-8f3b-926f66f29d80
Gauthier, Stephanie
4e7702f7-e1a9-4732-8430-fabbed0f56ed

Giakoumis, George and Gauthier, Stephanie (2016) Understanding window behaviour in a mixed-mode buildings and the impact on energy performance. In Proceedings of the 6th Masters Conference: People and Buildings.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Studies have shown that people feel more comfortable when they can control the environment in which they live and work. In a mixed-mode office building, this control is usually through openable windows, but window opening behaviour can have a significant impact on building energy performance. This monitoring study investigated window behaviours in a mixed-mode office building during the summer of 2016 in Southampton. Applying a mixed methods approach, 31 windows and 10 offices doors, movements were monitored using accelerometers. Concurrently indoor and outdoor environments were monitored and occupants' surveys undertaken. Results show a statistical relationship between window opening behaviour and indoor ambient and radiant temperature and CO2 levels. The reasons for opening a window temperature and humidity as reported from the occupant’s survey. Observed patterns of window opening behaviour did not match the building’s design strategy as users acted differently from what BMS advised. This will have a substantial impact on energy performance in summer.

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MC2016_Giakoumis_George - Author's Original
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More information

Published date: 23 September 2016
Additional Information: http://nceub.org.uk/ocs/index.php/mc/MC2016/
Keywords: Window behaviour, Energy performance gap, Mixed-mode buildings, Mixed-method approach, Longitudinal analysis

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 414904
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/414904
PURE UUID: 154bfc26-9edd-4c25-afac-9bcf13990e50
ORCID for Stephanie Gauthier: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1720-1736

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 16 Oct 2017 16:30
Last modified: 27 Jan 2020 13:48

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