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Best practice in research: Consensus Statement on Ethnopharmacological Field Studies – ConSEFS

Best practice in research: Consensus Statement on Ethnopharmacological Field Studies – ConSEFS
Best practice in research: Consensus Statement on Ethnopharmacological Field Studies – ConSEFS

Background:

Ethnopharmacological research aims at gathering information on local and traditional uses of plants and other natural substances. However, the approaches used and the methods employed vary, and while such a variability is desirable in terms of scientific diversity, research must adhere to well defined quality standards and reproducible methods


Objectives:

With ConSEFS (the Consensus Statement on Ethnopharmacological Field Studies) we want to define best-practice in developing, conducting and reporting field studies focusing on local and traditional uses of medicinal and food plants, including studies using a historical approach.


Methods:

After first developing an initial draft the core group invited community-wide feedback from researchers both through a web-based consultation and a series of workshops at conferences during 2017.


Outcomes:

The consultation resulted in a large number of responses. Feedback was received via a weblink on the Journal of Ethnopharmacology's website (ca. 100 responses), other oral and written responses (ca. 50) and discussions with stakeholders at four conferences. The main outcome is a checklist, covering best practice for designing, implementing and recording ethnopharmacological field studies and historical studies.


Conclusions:

Prior to starting ethnopharmacological field research, it is essential that the authors are fully aware of the best practice in the field. For the first time in the field of ethnopharmacology a community-wide document defines guidelines for best practice on how to conduct and report such studies. It will need to be updated and further developed. While the feedback has been based on responses by many experienced researchers, there is a need to test it in practice by using it both in implementing and reporting field studies (or historical studies), and peer-review.
Ethnopharmacology, Ethnobotany, Methods
0378-8741
329-229
Willcox, Merlin
dad5b622-9ac2-417d-9b2e-aad41b64ffea
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Willcox, Merlin ConSEFS Advisory group (2018) Best practice in research: Consensus Statement on Ethnopharmacological Field Studies – ConSEFS Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 211, pp. 329-229.

Willcox, Merlin ConSEFS Advisory group (2018) Best practice in research: Consensus Statement on Ethnopharmacological Field Studies – ConSEFS Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 211, pp. 329-229.

Record type: Article

Abstract


Background:

Ethnopharmacological research aims at gathering information on local and traditional uses of plants and other natural substances. However, the approaches used and the methods employed vary, and while such a variability is desirable in terms of scientific diversity, research must adhere to well defined quality standards and reproducible methods


Objectives:

With ConSEFS (the Consensus Statement on Ethnopharmacological Field Studies) we want to define best-practice in developing, conducting and reporting field studies focusing on local and traditional uses of medicinal and food plants, including studies using a historical approach.


Methods:

After first developing an initial draft the core group invited community-wide feedback from researchers both through a web-based consultation and a series of workshops at conferences during 2017.


Outcomes:

The consultation resulted in a large number of responses. Feedback was received via a weblink on the Journal of Ethnopharmacology's website (ca. 100 responses), other oral and written responses (ca. 50) and discussions with stakeholders at four conferences. The main outcome is a checklist, covering best practice for designing, implementing and recording ethnopharmacological field studies and historical studies.


Conclusions:

Prior to starting ethnopharmacological field research, it is essential that the authors are fully aware of the best practice in the field. For the first time in the field of ethnopharmacology a community-wide document defines guidelines for best practice on how to conduct and report such studies. It will need to be updated and further developed. While the feedback has been based on responses by many experienced researchers, there is a need to test it in practice by using it both in implementing and reporting field studies (or historical studies), and peer-review.

Text ConsEFS-R1-Clean-07-17ForElsevier - Accepted Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only until 15 August 2018.
Text CONSEFS2018 - Version of Record
Restricted to Repository staff only

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 9 August 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 15 August 2017
Published date: 30 January 2018
Keywords: Ethnopharmacology, Ethnobotany, Methods

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 415296
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/415296
ISSN: 0378-8741
PURE UUID: 2e2ed79e-e824-4bb9-bfb5-a07c81ddacae
ORCID for Merlin Willcox: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5227-3444

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 07 Nov 2017 17:30
Last modified: 12 Nov 2017 22:29

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