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Neoliberal disruption and neoliberalism’s afterlife in Latin America: What is left of post-neoliberalism?

Neoliberal disruption and neoliberalism’s afterlife in Latin America: What is left of post-neoliberalism?
Neoliberal disruption and neoliberalism’s afterlife in Latin America: What is left of post-neoliberalism?
The rejection of neoliberalism in Latin America at the time of the new millennium led to the emergence of a wave of ‘post neoliberal’ governments that sought to renegotiate the relationship between state and market and pioneer new forms of inclusive welfare. Supported by income from an export boom and a commitment to raising taxes, these governments attempted to implement a new economic model which bore some similarities to social democracy, alongside greater emphasis on recognition and identity politics. We ask here what accounts for the difficulties of institutionalising Leftist governance in Latin America and, in so doing, we draw attention to the embeddedness of the idea of neoliberal governance, globally and regionally. Whilst the weaknesses of the Left are real, the return of neoliberalism return, now on the horizon in Latin America, reflects the fact it is the global status quo.
0261-0183
1-20
Riggirozzi, Pia
ed3be4f8-37e7-46a2-8242-f6495d727c22
Grugel, Jean
11807d62-c315-4527-a3dd-d5f135f2d307
Riggirozzi, Pia
ed3be4f8-37e7-46a2-8242-f6495d727c22
Grugel, Jean
11807d62-c315-4527-a3dd-d5f135f2d307

Riggirozzi, Pia and Grugel, Jean (2018) Neoliberal disruption and neoliberalism’s afterlife in Latin America: What is left of post-neoliberalism? Critical Social Policy, 1-20. (doi:10.1177/0261018318765857).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The rejection of neoliberalism in Latin America at the time of the new millennium led to the emergence of a wave of ‘post neoliberal’ governments that sought to renegotiate the relationship between state and market and pioneer new forms of inclusive welfare. Supported by income from an export boom and a commitment to raising taxes, these governments attempted to implement a new economic model which bore some similarities to social democracy, alongside greater emphasis on recognition and identity politics. We ask here what accounts for the difficulties of institutionalising Leftist governance in Latin America and, in so doing, we draw attention to the embeddedness of the idea of neoliberal governance, globally and regionally. Whilst the weaknesses of the Left are real, the return of neoliberalism return, now on the horizon in Latin America, reflects the fact it is the global status quo.

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Accepted/In Press date: 30 October 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 29 March 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 415583
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/415583
ISSN: 0261-0183
PURE UUID: 2772b44c-03e1-448c-aa21-99f835e5f460
ORCID for Pia Riggirozzi: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5809-890X

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Date deposited: 15 Nov 2017 17:30
Last modified: 27 Apr 2022 04:56

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Contributors

Author: Pia Riggirozzi ORCID iD
Author: Jean Grugel

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