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Analysis of driver roles: modelling the changing role of the driver in automated driving systems using EAST

Analysis of driver roles: modelling the changing role of the driver in automated driving systems using EAST
Analysis of driver roles: modelling the changing role of the driver in automated driving systems using EAST
The purpose of this paper is to analyse the role of the driver within automated driving systems using the Event Analysis of Systemic Teamwork (EAST) method. We already know that as the level of automation increases within the driving task, the role of the driver shifts from that of an active operator (i.e. a driver driving) to more of a passive monitor (i.e. a driver monitoring). Task, social and information networks were constructed using the Hierarchical Task Analysis of Driving and evidence from driver verbalisations collected during a previous study to further explore the changing role of the driver using network analysis. A ‘broken links’ approach was conducted to show that momentary engagement in non-driving-related secondary tasks within an automated driving system can dramatically change the structure of driving system.
1464-536X
284-300
Steane, Victoria
0dbdcad0-c654-4b87-a804-6a7548d0196d
Stanton, Neville
351a44ab-09a0-422a-a738-01df1fe0fadd
Steane, Victoria
0dbdcad0-c654-4b87-a804-6a7548d0196d
Stanton, Neville
351a44ab-09a0-422a-a738-01df1fe0fadd

Steane, Victoria and Stanton, Neville (2019) Analysis of driver roles: modelling the changing role of the driver in automated driving systems using EAST. Theoretical Issues in Ergonomics Science, 20 (3), 284-300. (doi:10.1080/1463922X.2017.1305465).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the role of the driver within automated driving systems using the Event Analysis of Systemic Teamwork (EAST) method. We already know that as the level of automation increases within the driving task, the role of the driver shifts from that of an active operator (i.e. a driver driving) to more of a passive monitor (i.e. a driver monitoring). Task, social and information networks were constructed using the Hierarchical Task Analysis of Driving and evidence from driver verbalisations collected during a previous study to further explore the changing role of the driver using network analysis. A ‘broken links’ approach was conducted to show that momentary engagement in non-driving-related secondary tasks within an automated driving system can dramatically change the structure of driving system.

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Analysis of driver roles - accepted manuscript - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 8 March 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 24 January 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 416350
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/416350
ISSN: 1464-536X
PURE UUID: 3ae8a99d-2a0b-45fc-a3e2-5c7d403a21b0
ORCID for Neville Stanton: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8562-3279

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 13 Dec 2017 17:30
Last modified: 18 Feb 2021 17:13

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