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Unravelling the identity, metabolic potential, and global biogeography of the atmospheric methane-oxidising Upland Soil Cluster α: illuminating the USCα methanotrophs from soil

Unravelling the identity, metabolic potential, and global biogeography of the atmospheric methane-oxidising Upland Soil Cluster α: illuminating the USCα methanotrophs from soil
Unravelling the identity, metabolic potential, and global biogeography of the atmospheric methane-oxidising Upland Soil Cluster α: illuminating the USCα methanotrophs from soil
Understanding of global methane sources and sinks is a prerequisite for the design of strategies to counteract global warming. Microbial methane oxidation in soils represents the largest biological sink for atmospheric methane. However, still very little is known about the identity, metabolic properties, and distribution of the microbial group proposed to be responsible for most of this uptake, the uncultivated upland soil cluster α (USCα). Here, we reconstructed a draft genome of USCα from a combination of targeted cell sorting and metagenomes from forest soil, providing the first insights into its metabolic potential and environmental adaptation strategies. The 16S rRNA gene sequence recovered was distinctive and suggests this crucial group as a new genus within the Beijerinckiaceae, close to Methylocapsa. Application of a fluorescently labelled suicide substrate for the particulate methane monooxygenase enzyme (pMMO) coupled to 16S rRNA fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) allowed for the first time a direct link of the high-affinity activity of methane oxidation to USCα cells in situ. Analysis of the global biogeography of this group further revealed its presence in previously unrecognized habitats, such as subterranean and volcanic biofilm environments, indicating a potential role of these environments in the biological sink for atmospheric methane.
1462-2920
Pratscher, Jennifer
841eeaf9-1c2f-4223-8396-9bd9c9970022
Vollmers, John
c6b59f3b-155f-4bef-8b2c-e8f843117c72
Wiegand, Sandra
8528aaea-0372-4a66-b600-8014785a17c4
Dumont, Marc
afd9f08f-bdbb-4cee-b792-1a7f000ee511
Kaster, Anne-Kristin
d78084e6-4588-4772-b288-1db9c3816360
Pratscher, Jennifer
841eeaf9-1c2f-4223-8396-9bd9c9970022
Vollmers, John
c6b59f3b-155f-4bef-8b2c-e8f843117c72
Wiegand, Sandra
8528aaea-0372-4a66-b600-8014785a17c4
Dumont, Marc
afd9f08f-bdbb-4cee-b792-1a7f000ee511
Kaster, Anne-Kristin
d78084e6-4588-4772-b288-1db9c3816360

Pratscher, Jennifer, Vollmers, John, Wiegand, Sandra, Dumont, Marc and Kaster, Anne-Kristin (2018) Unravelling the identity, metabolic potential, and global biogeography of the atmospheric methane-oxidising Upland Soil Cluster α: illuminating the USCα methanotrophs from soil. Environmental Microbiology.

Record type: Article

Abstract

Understanding of global methane sources and sinks is a prerequisite for the design of strategies to counteract global warming. Microbial methane oxidation in soils represents the largest biological sink for atmospheric methane. However, still very little is known about the identity, metabolic properties, and distribution of the microbial group proposed to be responsible for most of this uptake, the uncultivated upland soil cluster α (USCα). Here, we reconstructed a draft genome of USCα from a combination of targeted cell sorting and metagenomes from forest soil, providing the first insights into its metabolic potential and environmental adaptation strategies. The 16S rRNA gene sequence recovered was distinctive and suggests this crucial group as a new genus within the Beijerinckiaceae, close to Methylocapsa. Application of a fluorescently labelled suicide substrate for the particulate methane monooxygenase enzyme (pMMO) coupled to 16S rRNA fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) allowed for the first time a direct link of the high-affinity activity of methane oxidation to USCα cells in situ. Analysis of the global biogeography of this group further revealed its presence in previously unrecognized habitats, such as subterranean and volcanic biofilm environments, indicating a potential role of these environments in the biological sink for atmospheric methane.

Text Pratscher accepted version - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 21 December 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 3 January 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 416662
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/416662
ISSN: 1462-2920
PURE UUID: 77ff691f-a8e3-48fa-84f0-3127c3215566
ORCID for Marc Dumont: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7347-8668

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Date deposited: 04 Jan 2018 17:30
Last modified: 04 Jan 2018 17:30

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Contributors

Author: Jennifer Pratscher
Author: John Vollmers
Author: Sandra Wiegand
Author: Marc Dumont ORCID iD
Author: Anne-Kristin Kaster

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