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Skin friction under pressure. The role of micromechanics

Skin friction under pressure. The role of micromechanics
Skin friction under pressure. The role of micromechanics
The role of contact pressure on skin friction has been documented in multiple experimental studies. Skin friction significantly raises in the low-pressure regime as load increases while, after a critical pressure value is reached, the coefficient of friction of skin against an external surface becomes mostly insensitive to contact pressure. However, up to now, no study has elucidated the qualitative and quantitative nature of the interplay between contact pressure, the material and microstructural properties of the skin, the size of an indenting-sliding object and the resulting measured macroscopic coefficient of friction. A mechanistic understanding of these aspects is essential for guiding the rational design of products intended to interact with the skin through optimally-tuned surface and/or microstructural properties.
 Here, an anatomically-realistic two-dimensional multi-layer finite element model of the skin was embedded within a computational contact homogenisation procedure. The main objective was to investigate the sensitivity of macrosocpic skin friction to the parameters discussed above, in addition to the local (i.e. microscopic) coefficient of friction defined at skin asperity level. This was accomplished via the design of a large-scale computational experiment featuring 312 analyses. Results confirmed the potentially major role of finite deformations of skin asperities on the resulting macroscopic friction. This effect was shown to be modulated by the level of contact pressure and relative size of skin surface asperities compared to those of a rigid slider. The numerical study also corroborated experimental observations concerning the existence of two contact pressure regimes where macroscopic friction steeply and non-linearly increases up to a critical value, and then remains approximately constant as pressure increases further.
 The proposed computational modelling platform offers attractive features which are beyond the reach of current analytical models of skin friction, namely, the ability to accommodate arbitrary kinematics, non-linear constitutive properties and the complex skin microstructure.
skin friction, contact mechanics, pressure, microstruct, finite element, material properties
Leyva Mendivil, Maria
a61cf963-b1f0-4aaa-89fe-0f6e60a636ef
Lengiewicz, Jakub
46edb5c9-a1b3-4cf7-9f48-04cc0b7e4244
Limbert, Georges
a1b88cb4-c5d9-4c6e-b6c9-7f4c4aa1c2ec
Leyva Mendivil, Maria
a61cf963-b1f0-4aaa-89fe-0f6e60a636ef
Lengiewicz, Jakub
46edb5c9-a1b3-4cf7-9f48-04cc0b7e4244
Limbert, Georges
a1b88cb4-c5d9-4c6e-b6c9-7f4c4aa1c2ec

Leyva Mendivil, Maria, Lengiewicz, Jakub and Limbert, Georges (2018) Skin friction under pressure. The role of micromechanics. Surface Topography: Metrology and Properties, 6, [014001]. (doi:10.1088/2051-672X/aaa2d4).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The role of contact pressure on skin friction has been documented in multiple experimental studies. Skin friction significantly raises in the low-pressure regime as load increases while, after a critical pressure value is reached, the coefficient of friction of skin against an external surface becomes mostly insensitive to contact pressure. However, up to now, no study has elucidated the qualitative and quantitative nature of the interplay between contact pressure, the material and microstructural properties of the skin, the size of an indenting-sliding object and the resulting measured macroscopic coefficient of friction. A mechanistic understanding of these aspects is essential for guiding the rational design of products intended to interact with the skin through optimally-tuned surface and/or microstructural properties.
 Here, an anatomically-realistic two-dimensional multi-layer finite element model of the skin was embedded within a computational contact homogenisation procedure. The main objective was to investigate the sensitivity of macrosocpic skin friction to the parameters discussed above, in addition to the local (i.e. microscopic) coefficient of friction defined at skin asperity level. This was accomplished via the design of a large-scale computational experiment featuring 312 analyses. Results confirmed the potentially major role of finite deformations of skin asperities on the resulting macroscopic friction. This effect was shown to be modulated by the level of contact pressure and relative size of skin surface asperities compared to those of a rigid slider. The numerical study also corroborated experimental observations concerning the existence of two contact pressure regimes where macroscopic friction steeply and non-linearly increases up to a critical value, and then remains approximately constant as pressure increases further.
 The proposed computational modelling platform offers attractive features which are beyond the reach of current analytical models of skin friction, namely, the ability to accommodate arbitrary kinematics, non-linear constitutive properties and the complex skin microstructure.

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STMP-100363_Reviewed manuscript (clean version) - Accepted Manuscript
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Leyva+Mendivil+et+al_2017_Surf._Topogr.-_Metrol._Prop._10.1088_2051-672X_aaa2d4 - Version of Record
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 19 December 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 19 January 2018
Keywords: skin friction, contact mechanics, pressure, microstruct, finite element, material properties

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 416751
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/416751
PURE UUID: f317a4de-8ce7-439d-8b26-ee950967004e

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Date deposited: 08 Jan 2018 17:30
Last modified: 21 Nov 2021 10:02

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Contributors

Author: Maria Leyva Mendivil
Author: Jakub Lengiewicz
Author: Georges Limbert

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