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Adverse weather evokes nostalgia

Adverse weather evokes nostalgia
Adverse weather evokes nostalgia
Four studies examined the link between adverse weather and the palliative role of nostalgia. We proposed and tested that: adverse weather evokes nostalgia (H1), adverse weather causes distress, which predicts elevated nostalgia (H2), preventing nostalgia exacerbates weather-induced distress (H3), and weather-evoked nostalgia confers psychological benefits (H4). In Study 1, participants listened to recordings of wind, thunder, rain, and neutral sounds. Adverse weather evoked nostalgia. In Study 2, participants kept a 10-day diary recording weather conditions, distress, and nostalgia. We also obtained meteorological data. Adverse weather perceptions were positively correlated with distress, which predicted higher nostalgia. Also, adverse natural weather was associated with corresponding weather perceptions, which predicted elevated nostalgia. (Results were mixed for rain.) In Study 3, preventing nostalgia (via cognitive load) increased weather-evoked distress. In Study 4, weather-evoked nostalgia was positively associated with psychological benefits. The findings pioneer the relevance of nostalgia as source of comfort in adverse weather.
0146-1672
Van Tilburg, Wijnand
7396f6c2-3a43-4d02-a4a0-97efe4d5ab12
Sedikides, Constantine
9d45e66d-75bb-44de-87d7-21fd553812c2
Wildschut, Tim
4452a61d-1649-4c4a-bb1d-154ec446ff81
Van Tilburg, Wijnand
7396f6c2-3a43-4d02-a4a0-97efe4d5ab12
Sedikides, Constantine
9d45e66d-75bb-44de-87d7-21fd553812c2
Wildschut, Tim
4452a61d-1649-4c4a-bb1d-154ec446ff81

Van Tilburg, Wijnand, Sedikides, Constantine and Wildschut, Tim (2018) Adverse weather evokes nostalgia. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin. (doi:10.1177/0146167218756030).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Four studies examined the link between adverse weather and the palliative role of nostalgia. We proposed and tested that: adverse weather evokes nostalgia (H1), adverse weather causes distress, which predicts elevated nostalgia (H2), preventing nostalgia exacerbates weather-induced distress (H3), and weather-evoked nostalgia confers psychological benefits (H4). In Study 1, participants listened to recordings of wind, thunder, rain, and neutral sounds. Adverse weather evoked nostalgia. In Study 2, participants kept a 10-day diary recording weather conditions, distress, and nostalgia. We also obtained meteorological data. Adverse weather perceptions were positively correlated with distress, which predicted higher nostalgia. Also, adverse natural weather was associated with corresponding weather perceptions, which predicted elevated nostalgia. (Results were mixed for rain.) In Study 3, preventing nostalgia (via cognitive load) increased weather-evoked distress. In Study 4, weather-evoked nostalgia was positively associated with psychological benefits. The findings pioneer the relevance of nostalgia as source of comfort in adverse weather.

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Van Tilburg, Sedikides, Wildschut - PSPB - Final accept - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 5 January 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 14 March 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 417120
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/417120
ISSN: 0146-1672
PURE UUID: 6d916ca0-68b1-4722-8a6b-ff86029d02fd

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Date deposited: 19 Jan 2018 17:30
Last modified: 15 Sep 2021 04:07

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