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Do psychopathic traits predict professional success?

Do psychopathic traits predict professional success?
Do psychopathic traits predict professional success?
Does psychopathy predict professional success? Psychopathy and professional success are multidimensional constructs, and thus certain elements of psychopathy may be related more strongly to certain elements of professional success. Also, psychopathic traits, comprising self-centered impulsivity, fearless dominance, and coldheartedness, may not predict professional success above and beyond the Big Five. We investigated whether self-centered impulsivity, fearless dominance, and coldheartedness predicted professional satisfaction (satisfaction with salary, with promotion, and with career) as well as material success (annual salary, number of promotions, and professional standing) in an occupational sample (N = 439). Self-centered impulsivity was inversely related to professional satisfaction, whereas fearless dominance was positively related to professional satisfaction and material success. Coldheartedness was related to neither of them. Adding the Big Five, as well as participant gender and time in job, as predictors revealed that extraversion and self-centered impulsivity predicted professional satisfaction, whereas only extraversion predicted material success; fearless dominance was no longer a significant predictor of material success. Taken together, self-centered impulsivity was negatively linked, whereas fearless dominance was positively linked, to professional success. The findings highlight the differential contribution of impulsiveness- versus fearlessness-related elements of psychopathic traits to professional satisfaction.
0167-4870
130-139
Eisenbarth, Hedwig
41af3dcb-da48-402b-a488-49de88e64f0c
Hart, Claire
e3db9c72-f493-439c-a358-b3b482d55103
Sedikides, Constantine
9d45e66d-75bb-44de-87d7-21fd553812c2
Eisenbarth, Hedwig
41af3dcb-da48-402b-a488-49de88e64f0c
Hart, Claire
e3db9c72-f493-439c-a358-b3b482d55103
Sedikides, Constantine
9d45e66d-75bb-44de-87d7-21fd553812c2

Eisenbarth, Hedwig, Hart, Claire and Sedikides, Constantine (2018) Do psychopathic traits predict professional success? Journal of Economic Psychology, 64, pp. 130-139. (doi:10.1016/j.joep.2018.01.002).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Does psychopathy predict professional success? Psychopathy and professional success are multidimensional constructs, and thus certain elements of psychopathy may be related more strongly to certain elements of professional success. Also, psychopathic traits, comprising self-centered impulsivity, fearless dominance, and coldheartedness, may not predict professional success above and beyond the Big Five. We investigated whether self-centered impulsivity, fearless dominance, and coldheartedness predicted professional satisfaction (satisfaction with salary, with promotion, and with career) as well as material success (annual salary, number of promotions, and professional standing) in an occupational sample (N = 439). Self-centered impulsivity was inversely related to professional satisfaction, whereas fearless dominance was positively related to professional satisfaction and material success. Coldheartedness was related to neither of them. Adding the Big Five, as well as participant gender and time in job, as predictors revealed that extraversion and self-centered impulsivity predicted professional satisfaction, whereas only extraversion predicted material success; fearless dominance was no longer a significant predictor of material success. Taken together, self-centered impulsivity was negatively linked, whereas fearless dominance was positively linked, to professional success. The findings highlight the differential contribution of impulsiveness- versus fearlessness-related elements of psychopathic traits to professional satisfaction.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 12 January 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 16 January 2018
Published date: 1 February 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 417121
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/417121
ISSN: 0167-4870
PURE UUID: d5134682-c024-4493-94d8-4d5df7b9c898
ORCID for Hedwig Eisenbarth: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0521-2630

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 19 Jan 2018 17:30
Last modified: 02 Feb 2018 17:30

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