The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Exposure to violence, teacher support, and school delay amongst adolescents in South Africa

Exposure to violence, teacher support, and school delay amongst adolescents in South Africa
Exposure to violence, teacher support, and school delay amongst adolescents in South Africa
Background

Many adolescents in South Africa are exposed to multiple types of violence, socio-economic disadvantage, and low-quality education: all risk factors for educational outcomes including school delay (grade enrolment below that which is age-appropriate). Supportive teacher–student relationships are known to be associated with improved academic outcomes in high-income contexts.

Aims

To investigate whether the academic and emotional support provided by teachers can protect against school delay for adolescents exposed to multiple types of violence and socio-economic disadvantage in South Africa.

Sample

High-risk sample of 503 adolescents aged 10–18 exposed to multiple types of violence and socio-economic disadvantage at home, in school, and in their communities.

Methods

Multilevel aggregated structural equation modelling was applied to pre/post-RCT data. This investigated whether associations between adolescent exposure to violence and school delay could be lessened by having teachers who were academically and/or emotionally supportive.

Results

More frequent exposure to ‘poly-violence’ and receiving more emotional support from teachers were independently associated with greater school delay. On the contrary, higher academic support from teachers was associated with lower school delay. Neither academic nor emotional teacher support was found to moderate the relationship between more frequent exposure to ‘poly-violence’ and an increased risk of adolescent school delay.

Conclusion

Adolescents’ academic support from teachers is low in poorly resourced school contexts in South Africa. School-based secondary prevention programmes assisting teachers with more training and academic support in deprived contexts have potential to reduce the impact of violence and socio-economic disadvantage on adolescents’ school delay.
teacher support, school delay, violence, socioeconomic disadvantage, adolescence, South Africa
0007-0998
Herrero Romero, Rocio
aaedce4e-698c-441f-b45c-43b838ebcffd
Hall, James
29e17a2b-dca0-4b91-be02-2ace4abaa6c4
Cluver, Lucie
cf7d64e0-8909-49f1-a94e-12c412539bd9
Herrero Romero, Rocio
aaedce4e-698c-441f-b45c-43b838ebcffd
Hall, James
29e17a2b-dca0-4b91-be02-2ace4abaa6c4
Cluver, Lucie
cf7d64e0-8909-49f1-a94e-12c412539bd9

Herrero Romero, Rocio, Hall, James and Cluver, Lucie (2018) Exposure to violence, teacher support, and school delay amongst adolescents in South Africa. British Journal of Educational Psychology. (doi:10.1111/bjep.12212).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background

Many adolescents in South Africa are exposed to multiple types of violence, socio-economic disadvantage, and low-quality education: all risk factors for educational outcomes including school delay (grade enrolment below that which is age-appropriate). Supportive teacher–student relationships are known to be associated with improved academic outcomes in high-income contexts.

Aims

To investigate whether the academic and emotional support provided by teachers can protect against school delay for adolescents exposed to multiple types of violence and socio-economic disadvantage in South Africa.

Sample

High-risk sample of 503 adolescents aged 10–18 exposed to multiple types of violence and socio-economic disadvantage at home, in school, and in their communities.

Methods

Multilevel aggregated structural equation modelling was applied to pre/post-RCT data. This investigated whether associations between adolescent exposure to violence and school delay could be lessened by having teachers who were academically and/or emotionally supportive.

Results

More frequent exposure to ‘poly-violence’ and receiving more emotional support from teachers were independently associated with greater school delay. On the contrary, higher academic support from teachers was associated with lower school delay. Neither academic nor emotional teacher support was found to moderate the relationship between more frequent exposure to ‘poly-violence’ and an increased risk of adolescent school delay.

Conclusion

Adolescents’ academic support from teachers is low in poorly resourced school contexts in South Africa. School-based secondary prevention programmes assisting teachers with more training and academic support in deprived contexts have potential to reduce the impact of violence and socio-economic disadvantage on adolescents’ school delay.

Text BJEP 2018 (accepted manuscript) - Accepted Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only until 16 January 2019.
Request a copy

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 10 November 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 16 January 2018
Keywords: teacher support, school delay, violence, socioeconomic disadvantage, adolescence, South Africa

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 417191
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/417191
ISSN: 0007-0998
PURE UUID: 12adbbda-13de-4cc6-be2c-69f967163001
ORCID for James Hall: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8002-0922

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 24 Jan 2018 17:30
Last modified: 23 May 2018 16:32

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Rocio Herrero Romero
Author: James Hall ORCID iD
Author: Lucie Cluver

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×