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Antimicrobial activity of a novel bioengineered honey against non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae biofilms: an in vitro study

Antimicrobial activity of a novel bioengineered honey against non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae biofilms: an in vitro study
Antimicrobial activity of a novel bioengineered honey against non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae biofilms: an in vitro study
The opportunistic pathogen non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) plays an important role in many chronic respiratory diseases including otitis media, chronic rhinosinusitis, cystic fibrosis, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Biofilm formation has been implicated in NTHi colonisation, persistence of infection, and recalcitrance towards antimicrobials. There is therefore a pressing need for the development of novel treatment strategies that are effective against NTHi biofilm-associated diseases. SurgihoneyROTM is a honey-based product that has been bioengineered to enable the slow release of H2O2, a reactive oxygen species to which H. influenzae is susceptible. Treatment of established NTHi biofilms with SurgihoneyROTM significantly reduced biofilm viability through enhanced H2O2 production, and was shown to be more effective than the conventional antibiotic co-amoxiclav.
0021-9746
554-558
Newby, Rachel
4eabc965-9422-42fc-a858-44b4d47626ae
Dryden, Matthew
28a2efa7-1f6a-4260-a05b-284448c248fc
Allan, Raymond
390a7d0a-38e1-410a-8dfe-c8ef8408f5e1
Salib, Rami
d6fde1c1-5b5e-43f7-ae1c-42cce6a0c9fc
Newby, Rachel
4eabc965-9422-42fc-a858-44b4d47626ae
Dryden, Matthew
28a2efa7-1f6a-4260-a05b-284448c248fc
Allan, Raymond
390a7d0a-38e1-410a-8dfe-c8ef8408f5e1
Salib, Rami
d6fde1c1-5b5e-43f7-ae1c-42cce6a0c9fc

Newby, Rachel, Dryden, Matthew, Allan, Raymond and Salib, Rami (2018) Antimicrobial activity of a novel bioengineered honey against non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae biofilms: an in vitro study. Journal of Clinical Pathology, 71, 554-558. (doi:10.1136/jclinpath-2017-204901).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The opportunistic pathogen non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) plays an important role in many chronic respiratory diseases including otitis media, chronic rhinosinusitis, cystic fibrosis, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Biofilm formation has been implicated in NTHi colonisation, persistence of infection, and recalcitrance towards antimicrobials. There is therefore a pressing need for the development of novel treatment strategies that are effective against NTHi biofilm-associated diseases. SurgihoneyROTM is a honey-based product that has been bioengineered to enable the slow release of H2O2, a reactive oxygen species to which H. influenzae is susceptible. Treatment of established NTHi biofilms with SurgihoneyROTM significantly reduced biofilm viability through enhanced H2O2 production, and was shown to be more effective than the conventional antibiotic co-amoxiclav.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 29 January 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 15 February 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 417507
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/417507
ISSN: 0021-9746
PURE UUID: 9f20785f-71bc-48c4-96e0-6ebb7ea07c71
ORCID for Rami Salib: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6753-7844

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Date deposited: 01 Feb 2018 17:30
Last modified: 14 Jun 2018 00:34

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Contributors

Author: Rachel Newby
Author: Matthew Dryden
Author: Raymond Allan
Author: Rami Salib ORCID iD

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