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Human placental oxygenation in late gestation: experimental and theoretical approaches

Human placental oxygenation in late gestation: experimental and theoretical approaches
Human placental oxygenation in late gestation: experimental and theoretical approaches

The placenta is crucial for life. It is an ephemeral but complex organ acting as the barrier interface between maternal and fetal circulations, providing exchange of gases, nutrients, hormones, waste products and immunoglobulins. Many gaps exist in our understanding of the detailed placental structure and function, particularly in relation to oxygen handling and transfer in healthy and pathological states in utero. Measurements to understand oxygen transfer in vivo in the human are limited, with no general agreement on the most appropriate methods. An invasive method for measuring partial pressure of oxygen in the intervillous space through needle electrode insertion at the time of Caesarean sections has been reported. This allows for direct measurements in vivo whilst maintaining near normal placental conditions, however there are practical and ethical implications in using this method for determination of placental oxygenation. Furthermore, oxygen levels are likely to be highly heterogeneous within the placenta. Emerging non-invasive techniques, such as MRI, and ex vivo research are capable of enhancing and improving current imaging methodology for placental villous structure and increase the precision of oxygen measurement within placental compartments. These techniques, in combination with mathematical modelling have stimulated novel cross-disciplinary approaches that could advance our understanding of placental oxygenation and its metabolism in normal and pathological pregnancies, improving clinical treatment options and ultimately outcomes for the patient. 

0022-3751
Nye, Gareth A.
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Ingram, Emma
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Johnstone, Edward D.
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Jensen, Oliver E.
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Scheider, Henning
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Lewis, Rohan
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Chernyavsky, Igor
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Brownbill, Paul
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Nye, Gareth A.
fed69f28-0795-4190-ba7e-4b61535c9291
Ingram, Emma
4ed67602-a09c-46e1-a25f-ce03234c9917
Johnstone, Edward D.
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Jensen, Oliver E.
a9eb8893-c250-4fcb-9878-12f950bf059f
Scheider, Henning
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Lewis, Rohan
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Chernyavsky, Igor
cba9ab8b-4faf-4bfc-8799-113aa748f15f
Brownbill, Paul
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Nye, Gareth A., Ingram, Emma, Johnstone, Edward D., Jensen, Oliver E., Scheider, Henning, Lewis, Rohan, Chernyavsky, Igor and Brownbill, Paul (2018) Human placental oxygenation in late gestation: experimental and theoretical approaches. The Journal of Physiology. (doi:10.1113/JP275633).

Record type: Review

Abstract

The placenta is crucial for life. It is an ephemeral but complex organ acting as the barrier interface between maternal and fetal circulations, providing exchange of gases, nutrients, hormones, waste products and immunoglobulins. Many gaps exist in our understanding of the detailed placental structure and function, particularly in relation to oxygen handling and transfer in healthy and pathological states in utero. Measurements to understand oxygen transfer in vivo in the human are limited, with no general agreement on the most appropriate methods. An invasive method for measuring partial pressure of oxygen in the intervillous space through needle electrode insertion at the time of Caesarean sections has been reported. This allows for direct measurements in vivo whilst maintaining near normal placental conditions, however there are practical and ethical implications in using this method for determination of placental oxygenation. Furthermore, oxygen levels are likely to be highly heterogeneous within the placenta. Emerging non-invasive techniques, such as MRI, and ex vivo research are capable of enhancing and improving current imaging methodology for placental villous structure and increase the precision of oxygen measurement within placental compartments. These techniques, in combination with mathematical modelling have stimulated novel cross-disciplinary approaches that could advance our understanding of placental oxygenation and its metabolism in normal and pathological pregnancies, improving clinical treatment options and ultimately outcomes for the patient. 

Text
Nye-JPysiol-review-2018-post-rebuttal - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 18 January 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 26 January 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 417730
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/417730
ISSN: 0022-3751
PURE UUID: 0255d3c9-0152-415f-aa1d-59041cc786b2
ORCID for Rohan Lewis: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4044-9104

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 12 Feb 2018 17:30
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 05:09

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Contributors

Author: Gareth A. Nye
Author: Emma Ingram
Author: Edward D. Johnstone
Author: Oliver E. Jensen
Author: Henning Scheider
Author: Rohan Lewis ORCID iD
Author: Igor Chernyavsky
Author: Paul Brownbill

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