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Scapular kinematics in professional wheelchair tennis players

Scapular kinematics in professional wheelchair tennis players
Scapular kinematics in professional wheelchair tennis players
Background: Participating in wheelchair tennis increases the demands placed on the shoulder and could increase the risk of developing shoulder pain and injury that might be associated with differences in scapular kinematics. The aim of the study was to examine the presence of shoulder pain and scapular kinematics in professional wheelchair tennis players.

Method: Scapular kinematics were obtained in 11 professional wheelchair tennis players, 16 people with shoulder impingement and 16 people without shoulder impingement during humeral elevation and lowering. Clinical examination of the wheelchair tennis players was undertaken using the Wheelchair Users Shoulder Disability Index (WUSPI) and clinical signs of shoulder impingement.

Findings: The WUSPI questionnaire (mean = 28 SD 13.8) demonstrated wheelchair tennis participants experienced little shoulder pain and clinical examination revealed negative impingement tests. Wheelchair tennis players had greater scapular posterior tilt during humeral elevation (3.9° SE 1.71; P = 0.048) and lowering (4.3° SE 1.8; P = 0.04) on the dominant compared to non-dominant side. The dominant scapulae of wheelchair tennis players were significantly (P = 0.014) more upwardly rotated (21° SD 6.7) than the scapulae of people with shoulder impingement (14.1° SD 7.0) during scapular plane humeral elevation.

Interpretation: This first study of scapular kinematics in professional wheelchair tennis athletes demonstrated bilateral asymmetries and differences to able-bodied participants with shoulder impingement. Understanding the role of sport participation on shoulder function in wheelchair users would assist in the development of preventative and treatment exercise programmes for wheelchair users at risk of shoulder injury and pain.
0268-0033
7-13
Warner, Martin
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Wilson, David
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Heller, Markus O.
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Wood, Dan
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Worsley, Peter
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Mottram, Sarah
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Webborn, Nick
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Veeger, DirkJan
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Batt, Mark
0ee6bca1-79f5-43e9-8310-a752ca92a468
Warner, Martin
f4dce73d-fb87-4f71-a3f0-078123aa040c
Wilson, David
c3a39c4c-722b-4ff6-9531-a8d04e9a40c1
Heller, Markus O.
3da19d2a-f34d-4ff1-8a34-9b5a7e695829
Wood, Dan
430534d6-c6f7-49f5-83bf-87b08f03a2ff
Worsley, Peter
6d33aee3-ef43-468d-aef6-86d190de6756
Mottram, Sarah
1d5657d1-cb55-4fc8-9d11-986f551d4ef6
Webborn, Nick
a6a08c1f-15e6-46dc-a5e6-094791e1c8fb
Veeger, DirkJan
8f2335c4-ba4c-4a23-8611-e3eed20826d6
Batt, Mark
0ee6bca1-79f5-43e9-8310-a752ca92a468

Warner, Martin, Wilson, David, Heller, Markus O., Wood, Dan, Worsley, Peter, Mottram, Sarah, Webborn, Nick, Veeger, DirkJan and Batt, Mark (2018) Scapular kinematics in professional wheelchair tennis players. Clinical Biomechanics, 53, 7-13. (doi:10.1016/j.clinbiomech.2018.01.022).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: Participating in wheelchair tennis increases the demands placed on the shoulder and could increase the risk of developing shoulder pain and injury that might be associated with differences in scapular kinematics. The aim of the study was to examine the presence of shoulder pain and scapular kinematics in professional wheelchair tennis players.

Method: Scapular kinematics were obtained in 11 professional wheelchair tennis players, 16 people with shoulder impingement and 16 people without shoulder impingement during humeral elevation and lowering. Clinical examination of the wheelchair tennis players was undertaken using the Wheelchair Users Shoulder Disability Index (WUSPI) and clinical signs of shoulder impingement.

Findings: The WUSPI questionnaire (mean = 28 SD 13.8) demonstrated wheelchair tennis participants experienced little shoulder pain and clinical examination revealed negative impingement tests. Wheelchair tennis players had greater scapular posterior tilt during humeral elevation (3.9° SE 1.71; P = 0.048) and lowering (4.3° SE 1.8; P = 0.04) on the dominant compared to non-dominant side. The dominant scapulae of wheelchair tennis players were significantly (P = 0.014) more upwardly rotated (21° SD 6.7) than the scapulae of people with shoulder impingement (14.1° SD 7.0) during scapular plane humeral elevation.

Interpretation: This first study of scapular kinematics in professional wheelchair tennis athletes demonstrated bilateral asymmetries and differences to able-bodied participants with shoulder impingement. Understanding the role of sport participation on shoulder function in wheelchair users would assist in the development of preventative and treatment exercise programmes for wheelchair users at risk of shoulder injury and pain.

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Scapular kinematics in professional wheelchair tennis players - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 24 January 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 31 January 2018
Published date: 1 March 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 417843
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/417843
ISSN: 0268-0033
PURE UUID: cdf1919f-c93e-4041-8ab6-961ccd7b469d
ORCID for Martin Warner: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1483-0561
ORCID for David Wilson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6304-2836
ORCID for Markus O. Heller: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7879-1135
ORCID for Peter Worsley: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0145-5042

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 15 Feb 2018 17:30
Last modified: 23 Feb 2021 05:01

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Contributors

Author: Martin Warner ORCID iD
Author: David Wilson ORCID iD
Author: Dan Wood
Author: Peter Worsley ORCID iD
Author: Sarah Mottram
Author: Nick Webborn
Author: DirkJan Veeger
Author: Mark Batt

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