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State of the art of rechargeable aluminium batteries in non-aqueous systems: A perspective

State of the art of rechargeable aluminium batteries in non-aqueous systems: A perspective
State of the art of rechargeable aluminium batteries in non-aqueous systems: A perspective
The main challenges to implement sustainable energy storage technologies are the utilisation of earth-abundant recyclable materials, low costs, safe cell reactions and high performance, all in a single system. Aluminium batteries seem to cover these requirements. However, their practical performance is still not comparable with the state of the art high performance batteries. A key aspect to further development could be the combination of aluminium with charge storage materials like conductive polymers in non-aqueous electrolytes taking advantage of the properties of each material. This review presents the approaches and perspectives for rechargeable aluminium-based batteries as sustainable high-performance energy storage devices.
Aluminium; batteries; charge storage materials; conductive polymers; ionic liquids
0013-4651
A3499-A3502
Schoetz, T.
cf930a0a-087e-4be0-ac2b-614abcc3f424
Ponce De Leon, C.
508a312e-75ff-4bcb-9151-dacc424d755c
Ueda, M.
605dc0d5-cd98-4b87-b31b-7b308955a1d3
Bund, A.
4ed46a72-39e2-4d2b-a5cf-0b713be53680
Schoetz, T.
cf930a0a-087e-4be0-ac2b-614abcc3f424
Ponce De Leon, C.
508a312e-75ff-4bcb-9151-dacc424d755c
Ueda, M.
605dc0d5-cd98-4b87-b31b-7b308955a1d3
Bund, A.
4ed46a72-39e2-4d2b-a5cf-0b713be53680

Schoetz, T., Ponce De Leon, C., Ueda, M. and Bund, A. (2017) State of the art of rechargeable aluminium batteries in non-aqueous systems: A perspective. Journal of the Electrochemical Society, 164 (14), A3499-A3502. (doi:10.1149/2.0311714jes).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The main challenges to implement sustainable energy storage technologies are the utilisation of earth-abundant recyclable materials, low costs, safe cell reactions and high performance, all in a single system. Aluminium batteries seem to cover these requirements. However, their practical performance is still not comparable with the state of the art high performance batteries. A key aspect to further development could be the combination of aluminium with charge storage materials like conductive polymers in non-aqueous electrolytes taking advantage of the properties of each material. This review presents the approaches and perspectives for rechargeable aluminium-based batteries as sustainable high-performance energy storage devices.

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Accepted/In Press date: 6 November 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 14 November 2017
Keywords: Aluminium; batteries; charge storage materials; conductive polymers; ionic liquids

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 417935
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/417935
ISSN: 0013-4651
PURE UUID: 9cbb843c-ca6d-4eb4-97d9-36a178a90002
ORCID for C. Ponce De Leon: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1907-5913

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Date deposited: 16 Feb 2018 17:32
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 01:51

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Contributors

Author: T. Schoetz
Author: M. Ueda
Author: A. Bund

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