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Understanding the impact of human sounds on eel behaviour, a way to develop behavioural guidance techniques

Understanding the impact of human sounds on eel behaviour, a way to develop behavioural guidance techniques
Understanding the impact of human sounds on eel behaviour, a way to develop behavioural guidance techniques
The use of sound as a fisheries management tool is a growing area of research. A large amount of interest has been directed towards the use of ultrasound as a means of deterring clupeid and salmonid fish from hazardous areas and guiding them towards safer alternative routes. Infrasound has been used also in an attempt to deter other species, such as the European eel (Anguilla anguilla).
The aim of this study was to investigate the potential use of sound to manipulate fish behaviour in order to mitigate the impacts of man-made structures. Attempts were made to deter, attract, or elicit other behavioural responses in two migrating species, the European eel and the River lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis). Various sound intensities and frequencies were investigated under different experimental settings. Individuals were exposed to tones of incrementally changing frequency, at various sound levels, in single tanks while their behaviours were recorded. This allowed us to study the response of the two species to sounds of different frequencies at different levels.
In order to see if these findings could be applicable outside of such restricted tank environments, another set of experiments have been conducted in an outdoor re-circulatory flume.
The first experiment consisted of an "Acoustic maze" which presented each fish, one at a time, with a multiple choice of corridors to go through, with some corridors containing far more intense sound fields than others. The aim of this experiment was to observe any bias in favour of either the corridors with sound or the corridors without sound illustrating an attraction or repulsion for the stimulus. A continuous broadband noise including frequencies between 60 and 1000Hz was used as the stimulus.
The second experiment consisted of a setup with a standard vertical bar screen and a bypass channel. In this experiment, a series of three underwater speakers were set up in order to create an area of sound anterior to the screen. The effectiveness of using combined physical and acoustic screens to deflect fish to more benign bypass routes was tested. The same type of stimulus as in the previous experiment was used and another run of trials was done with 100 Hz pulsed tones.
Preliminary results have suggested that sound was having an effect on both species behaviours, although the response varies intra- and interspecifically. In addition, fish have shown significant numbers of repulsions to sound's exposure in both experiments held in the re-circulatory flume.
Deleau, Mathias
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Leighton, Timothy
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White, Paul
2dd2477b-5aa9-42e2-9d19-0806d994eaba
Kemp, Paul
9e33fba6-cccf-4eb5-965b-b70e72b11cd7
Deleau, Mathias
0c5300a5-cb7c-44bc-8630-ad00d4e8bf41
Leighton, Timothy
3e5262ce-1d7d-42eb-b013-fcc5c286bbae
White, Paul
2dd2477b-5aa9-42e2-9d19-0806d994eaba
Kemp, Paul
9e33fba6-cccf-4eb5-965b-b70e72b11cd7

Deleau, Mathias, Leighton, Timothy, White, Paul and Kemp, Paul (2016) Understanding the impact of human sounds on eel behaviour, a way to develop behavioural guidance techniques.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Poster)

Abstract

The use of sound as a fisheries management tool is a growing area of research. A large amount of interest has been directed towards the use of ultrasound as a means of deterring clupeid and salmonid fish from hazardous areas and guiding them towards safer alternative routes. Infrasound has been used also in an attempt to deter other species, such as the European eel (Anguilla anguilla).
The aim of this study was to investigate the potential use of sound to manipulate fish behaviour in order to mitigate the impacts of man-made structures. Attempts were made to deter, attract, or elicit other behavioural responses in two migrating species, the European eel and the River lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis). Various sound intensities and frequencies were investigated under different experimental settings. Individuals were exposed to tones of incrementally changing frequency, at various sound levels, in single tanks while their behaviours were recorded. This allowed us to study the response of the two species to sounds of different frequencies at different levels.
In order to see if these findings could be applicable outside of such restricted tank environments, another set of experiments have been conducted in an outdoor re-circulatory flume.
The first experiment consisted of an "Acoustic maze" which presented each fish, one at a time, with a multiple choice of corridors to go through, with some corridors containing far more intense sound fields than others. The aim of this experiment was to observe any bias in favour of either the corridors with sound or the corridors without sound illustrating an attraction or repulsion for the stimulus. A continuous broadband noise including frequencies between 60 and 1000Hz was used as the stimulus.
The second experiment consisted of a setup with a standard vertical bar screen and a bypass channel. In this experiment, a series of three underwater speakers were set up in order to create an area of sound anterior to the screen. The effectiveness of using combined physical and acoustic screens to deflect fish to more benign bypass routes was tested. The same type of stimulus as in the previous experiment was used and another run of trials was done with 100 Hz pulsed tones.
Preliminary results have suggested that sound was having an effect on both species behaviours, although the response varies intra- and interspecifically. In addition, fish have shown significant numbers of repulsions to sound's exposure in both experiments held in the re-circulatory flume.

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AN2016 - Poster 1.5
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Published date: July 2016

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 418474
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/418474
PURE UUID: 9b8da6f0-a096-482c-94b7-09914319322d
ORCID for Timothy Leighton: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1649-8750
ORCID for Paul White: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4787-8713
ORCID for Paul Kemp: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4470-0589

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Date deposited: 09 Mar 2018 17:30
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 01:54

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Contributors

Author: Mathias Deleau
Author: Paul White ORCID iD
Author: Paul Kemp ORCID iD

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