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Sexual minority youth continue to smoke cigarettes earlier and more often than heterosexuals: findings from population-based data

Sexual minority youth continue to smoke cigarettes earlier and more often than heterosexuals: findings from population-based data
Sexual minority youth continue to smoke cigarettes earlier and more often than heterosexuals: findings from population-based data
Background: an established body of research documents that sexual minority (i.e., lesbian, gay, and bisexual) populations are at higher risk for several adverse health behaviors and outcomes compared to their heterosexual counterparts. Smoking is one behavior where the gap is especially large, particularly among youth. Researchers have increasingly drawn attention to contextual determinants of health behaviors affecting sexual minority youth.

Purpose: although these factors have evolved over time, few scholars have examined time as a contextual factor that affects sexual minority health behaviors or the level of inequality with heterosexual populations. We aimed to fill this gap.

Procedures: we used eight years of data from the Massachusetts Youth Risk Behavior Survey (MYRBS), pooled into four waves, to determine whether gaps between sexual minority and heterosexual youth have widened or narrowed for three different indicators of smoking: having ever smoked, early onset smoking, and daily cigarette smoking in the past 30 days.

Results: we find that, though rates of smoking for all youth in Massachusetts have declined since the late 1990s, significant disparities remain between sexual minority and heterosexual youth.

Conclusions: findings may suggest that targeted tobacco control programs in Massachusetts are needed; perhaps shifts in social attitudes toward smoking have affected smoking behaviors in diverse segments of society.
0376-8716
64-70
Watson, Ryan
f865d4bb-dff7-415c-a19a-40d665fe988a
Lewis, Nathaniel
f0218afb-51ea-4141-a1e9-d031d8b98645
Fish, Jessica
16590ef7-8cc4-475c-98e8-e4801a009bd9
Goodenow, Carol
5efe65d0-a158-42e7-9501-8d4d7f03b3be
Watson, Ryan
f865d4bb-dff7-415c-a19a-40d665fe988a
Lewis, Nathaniel
f0218afb-51ea-4141-a1e9-d031d8b98645
Fish, Jessica
16590ef7-8cc4-475c-98e8-e4801a009bd9
Goodenow, Carol
5efe65d0-a158-42e7-9501-8d4d7f03b3be

Watson, Ryan, Lewis, Nathaniel, Fish, Jessica and Goodenow, Carol (2018) Sexual minority youth continue to smoke cigarettes earlier and more often than heterosexuals: findings from population-based data. Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 184 (64-70), 64-70. (doi:10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2017.11.025).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: an established body of research documents that sexual minority (i.e., lesbian, gay, and bisexual) populations are at higher risk for several adverse health behaviors and outcomes compared to their heterosexual counterparts. Smoking is one behavior where the gap is especially large, particularly among youth. Researchers have increasingly drawn attention to contextual determinants of health behaviors affecting sexual minority youth.

Purpose: although these factors have evolved over time, few scholars have examined time as a contextual factor that affects sexual minority health behaviors or the level of inequality with heterosexual populations. We aimed to fill this gap.

Procedures: we used eight years of data from the Massachusetts Youth Risk Behavior Survey (MYRBS), pooled into four waves, to determine whether gaps between sexual minority and heterosexual youth have widened or narrowed for three different indicators of smoking: having ever smoked, early onset smoking, and daily cigarette smoking in the past 30 days.

Results: we find that, though rates of smoking for all youth in Massachusetts have declined since the late 1990s, significant disparities remain between sexual minority and heterosexual youth.

Conclusions: findings may suggest that targeted tobacco control programs in Massachusetts are needed; perhaps shifts in social attitudes toward smoking have affected smoking behaviors in diverse segments of society.

Text
Watson et al. DAD 2018 - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 22 November 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 31 January 2018
Published date: 1 March 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 418833
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/418833
ISSN: 0376-8716
PURE UUID: 5648b4f8-38e1-42c8-be26-c7fc17370dba

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Date deposited: 23 Mar 2018 17:30
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 05:10

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