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Naturalistic decision making: taking a (cognitive) step back to take two steps forward in understanding experience based decisions

Naturalistic decision making: taking a (cognitive) step back to take two steps forward in understanding experience based decisions
Naturalistic decision making: taking a (cognitive) step back to take two steps forward in understanding experience based decisions
The field of naturalistic decision making research has hugely advanced understanding of how experts make decisions in operational environments. However, there is still a drive to improve the credibility and transferability of such research. In the current work four studies are presented which used similar methods. Standardised measures of cognitive function were administered to Authorised Firearms Officers (AFOs) after completion of immersive tactical training scenarios. The tests were chosen to examine differences between information modalities (e.g. visual vs. phonological). Results indicate that the demand associated with tactical training scenarios led to cognitive adaptions, resulting in significant increase in visual processing capacity and reductions in phonological processing capacity. The findings indicate that an adaptive switch to visual information modality may underpin experience-based decision making by AFOs. The findings provide insight into why training and policy should keep verbal and auditory demands placed on AFOs to a minimum.
Naturalistic Decision Making, Police, Firearms, Cognition
2211-3681
70-81
Roberts, Aaron
a2fb35d9-a42f-4a07-848d-01cecae9d893
Cole, Jon C.
ece963a7-109e-44da-9519-5256cb154b27
Roberts, Aaron
a2fb35d9-a42f-4a07-848d-01cecae9d893
Cole, Jon C.
ece963a7-109e-44da-9519-5256cb154b27

Roberts, Aaron and Cole, Jon C. (2018) Naturalistic decision making: taking a (cognitive) step back to take two steps forward in understanding experience based decisions. Journal of Applied Research in Memory and Cognition, 7 (1), 70-81. (doi:10.1016/j.jarmac.2018.01.003).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The field of naturalistic decision making research has hugely advanced understanding of how experts make decisions in operational environments. However, there is still a drive to improve the credibility and transferability of such research. In the current work four studies are presented which used similar methods. Standardised measures of cognitive function were administered to Authorised Firearms Officers (AFOs) after completion of immersive tactical training scenarios. The tests were chosen to examine differences between information modalities (e.g. visual vs. phonological). Results indicate that the demand associated with tactical training scenarios led to cognitive adaptions, resulting in significant increase in visual processing capacity and reductions in phonological processing capacity. The findings indicate that an adaptive switch to visual information modality may underpin experience-based decision making by AFOs. The findings provide insight into why training and policy should keep verbal and auditory demands placed on AFOs to a minimum.

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Roberts_NDM_Special_Issue_Firearm_Main_Body_v2_new_version (1) - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 9 January 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 16 February 2018
Keywords: Naturalistic Decision Making, Police, Firearms, Cognition

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 418983
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/418983
ISSN: 2211-3681
PURE UUID: 0b0a5349-db14-41ef-98b5-ccbce67fca1c

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Date deposited: 27 Mar 2018 16:30
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 05:06

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