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Macrocognition in submarine command and control: a comparison of three simulated operational scenarios

Macrocognition in submarine command and control: a comparison of three simulated operational scenarios
Macrocognition in submarine command and control: a comparison of three simulated operational scenarios

Submarine command and control operations are not well understood, but they are an exemplar of macrocognition. For the first time, this study compares three operational scenarios in a simulated submarine control room: returning to periscope depth (RTPD), inshore operations (INSO), and dived tracking of contact (DT). The event analysis of systematic teamwork (EAST) method was used to model macrocognition by way of social, task, and information networks. Results indicate that the composition of the networks differed significantly depending upon operation type and demand. The statistical differences reveal how macrocognitive processes such as situation assessment, coordination, and problem detection are context dependent and drive the attainment of team knowledge to suit operational requirements. The Officer of the Watch consistently had the highest centrality of all operators, highlighting the importance of this operator in utilising team knowledge to inform tactical decisions. Implications are discussed alongside suggestions for future work.

Communications, Macrocognition, Networks, Submarine, Team work
2211-3681
1-14
Roberts, Aaron P.J.
a2fb35d9-a42f-4a07-848d-01cecae9d893
Stanton, Neville A.
351a44ab-09a0-422a-a738-01df1fe0fadd
Roberts, Aaron P.J.
a2fb35d9-a42f-4a07-848d-01cecae9d893
Stanton, Neville A.
351a44ab-09a0-422a-a738-01df1fe0fadd

Roberts, Aaron P.J. and Stanton, Neville A. (2018) Macrocognition in submarine command and control: a comparison of three simulated operational scenarios. Journal of Applied Research in Memory and Cognition, 1-14. (doi:10.1016/j.jarmac.2018.01.006).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Submarine command and control operations are not well understood, but they are an exemplar of macrocognition. For the first time, this study compares three operational scenarios in a simulated submarine control room: returning to periscope depth (RTPD), inshore operations (INSO), and dived tracking of contact (DT). The event analysis of systematic teamwork (EAST) method was used to model macrocognition by way of social, task, and information networks. Results indicate that the composition of the networks differed significantly depending upon operation type and demand. The statistical differences reveal how macrocognitive processes such as situation assessment, coordination, and problem detection are context dependent and drive the attainment of team knowledge to suit operational requirements. The Officer of the Watch consistently had the highest centrality of all operators, highlighting the importance of this operator in utilising team knowledge to inform tactical decisions. Implications are discussed alongside suggestions for future work.

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Roberts_Stanton_2018_NDM_Special_Issue_Submarine_Main_Body_v2 - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 12 January 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 14 February 2018
Keywords: Communications, Macrocognition, Networks, Submarine, Team work

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 419006
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/419006
ISSN: 2211-3681
PURE UUID: ae80027a-56df-47c0-9a06-196bf9f87127
ORCID for Neville A. Stanton: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8562-3279

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 27 Mar 2018 16:30
Last modified: 30 Jan 2020 05:04

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