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Oral processing behaviours that promote children's energy intake are associated with parent-reported appetitive traits: Results from the GUSTO cohort

Oral processing behaviours that promote children's energy intake are associated with parent-reported appetitive traits: Results from the GUSTO cohort
Oral processing behaviours that promote children's energy intake are associated with parent-reported appetitive traits: Results from the GUSTO cohort
Oral processing behaviours associated with faster eating rates have been consistently linked to increased energy intakes, but little is known about their links to children's appetitive traits. This study used the Child Eating Behaviour Questionnaire (CEBQ) to explore cross-sectional and prospective associations between parent-reported appetitive traits and observed oral processing behaviours. Participants were 195 children from the Growing Up in Singapore Towards healthy Outcomes cohort, who participated in a video-recorded ad libitum lunch at 4.5 (Time 1) and 6 years (Time 2). Their mothers completed the CEBQ around the same time points. Children's bites, chews and swallows were coded, and used to calculate their eating rate, bite size, chews per bite, chew rate, oral exposure time and oral exposure per bite. At Time 1, children with higher scores in slowness in eating had lower eating and chew rates. At Time 2, higher scores for food enjoyment and lower for satiety responsiveness, slowness in eating, and food fussiness were linked with higher eating rates and greater energy intakes (r > 0.16, p < 0.05). Post-hoc analyses revealed that these associations were moderated by BMI and only present among children with higher BMI. Faster eating rates mediated the associations between greater food enjoyment, lower slowness in eating, lower food fussiness and higher intakes of energy. Children with higher slowness in eating scores had lower increases in eating rates over time, and children with higher BMI who had greater food enjoyment and food responsiveness scores had greater increases in eating rates over time. The findings suggest that oral processing behaviours linked with increased obesity risk may be underpinned by appetitive traits and may be one of the behavioural pathways through which these appetitive traits influence energy intakes.
0195-6663
8-15
Fogel, Anna
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Fries, Lisa
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McCrickerd, Keri
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Goh, Ai Ting
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Quah, Phaik Ling
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Chan, Mei Jun
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Toh, Jia Ying
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Chong, Yap-Seng
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Tan, Kok Hian
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Yap, Fabian
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Shek, Lynette
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Meaney, Michael J.
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Broekman, Birit
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Lee, Yung Seng
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Godfrey, Keith
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Chong, Mary F.F.
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Forde, Ciaran G.
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Fogel, Anna
411d37b1-52c9-451f-a3ca-32505b645d18
Fries, Lisa
87463d49-0bf8-4bfc-9c16-9ad1d71eb199
McCrickerd, Keri
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Goh, Ai Ting
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Quah, Phaik Ling
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Chan, Mei Jun
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Toh, Jia Ying
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Chong, Yap-Seng
7043124b-e892-4d4b-8bb7-6d35ed94e136
Tan, Kok Hian
87137812-e57d-4a7e-9d08-1ebdf10ceaef
Yap, Fabian
92843bb8-1c32-46d7-a778-92b2e655e533
Shek, Lynette
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Meaney, Michael J.
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Broekman, Birit
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Lee, Yung Seng
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Godfrey, Keith
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Chong, Mary F.F.
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Forde, Ciaran G.
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Fogel, Anna, Fries, Lisa, McCrickerd, Keri, Goh, Ai Ting, Quah, Phaik Ling, Chan, Mei Jun, Toh, Jia Ying, Chong, Yap-Seng, Tan, Kok Hian, Yap, Fabian, Shek, Lynette, Meaney, Michael J., Broekman, Birit, Lee, Yung Seng, Godfrey, Keith, Chong, Mary F.F. and Forde, Ciaran G. (2018) Oral processing behaviours that promote children's energy intake are associated with parent-reported appetitive traits: Results from the GUSTO cohort. Appetite, 126, 8-15. (doi:10.1016/j.appet.2018.03.011).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Oral processing behaviours associated with faster eating rates have been consistently linked to increased energy intakes, but little is known about their links to children's appetitive traits. This study used the Child Eating Behaviour Questionnaire (CEBQ) to explore cross-sectional and prospective associations between parent-reported appetitive traits and observed oral processing behaviours. Participants were 195 children from the Growing Up in Singapore Towards healthy Outcomes cohort, who participated in a video-recorded ad libitum lunch at 4.5 (Time 1) and 6 years (Time 2). Their mothers completed the CEBQ around the same time points. Children's bites, chews and swallows were coded, and used to calculate their eating rate, bite size, chews per bite, chew rate, oral exposure time and oral exposure per bite. At Time 1, children with higher scores in slowness in eating had lower eating and chew rates. At Time 2, higher scores for food enjoyment and lower for satiety responsiveness, slowness in eating, and food fussiness were linked with higher eating rates and greater energy intakes (r > 0.16, p < 0.05). Post-hoc analyses revealed that these associations were moderated by BMI and only present among children with higher BMI. Faster eating rates mediated the associations between greater food enjoyment, lower slowness in eating, lower food fussiness and higher intakes of energy. Children with higher slowness in eating scores had lower increases in eating rates over time, and children with higher BMI who had greater food enjoyment and food responsiveness scores had greater increases in eating rates over time. The findings suggest that oral processing behaviours linked with increased obesity risk may be underpinned by appetitive traits and may be one of the behavioural pathways through which these appetitive traits influence energy intakes.

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M4 CEBQ Appetite Revision for submission - Accepted Manuscript
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M4 Participant flowchart revised for submission
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Supplementary material B Descriptive table
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 14 March 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 15 March 2018
Published date: 1 July 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 419233
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/419233
ISSN: 0195-6663
PURE UUID: 3a34af8d-1bf3-4af1-a1be-bf8a99f740f6
ORCID for Keith Godfrey: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4643-0618

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 09 Apr 2018 16:30
Last modified: 10 Dec 2019 05:29

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