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Minor neurological dysfunction and associations with motor function, general cognitive abilities, and behaviour in children born extremely preterm

Minor neurological dysfunction and associations with motor function, general cognitive abilities, and behaviour in children born extremely preterm
Minor neurological dysfunction and associations with motor function, general cognitive abilities, and behaviour in children born extremely preterm
AIM:To study the prevalence of minor neurological dysfunction (MND) at 6 years of age in a cohort of children born extremely preterm without cerebral palsy (CP) and to investigate associations with motor function, cognitive abilities, and behaviour.METHOD:This study assessed 80 children born at less than 27 weeks of gestation and 90 children born at term age between 2004 and 2007 at a mean age of 6 years 6 months. The assessments included a simplified version of the Touwen Infant Neurological Examination, the Movement Assessment Battery for Children, Second Edition (MABC-2), Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, Fourth Edition (WISC-IV), the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ), and the parent version of the Five to Fifteen questionnaire.RESULTS:Fifty-one of the children born preterm had normal neurology, 23 had simple MND, and six had complex MND compared with 88 who had normal neurology and two simple MND in the term-born group (p<0.001). There were significant differences between the children with normal neurology and MND in the preterm group in MABC-2-assessed motor function (p<0.001), general cognitive abilities with WISC-IV (p=0.005), and SDQ overall behavioural problems and peer problems reported by the parents (p=0.021 and p=0.003 respectively). SDQ teacher-reported overall behavioural and hyperactivity problems were significantly different between children with normal and simple MND (p=0.036 and p=0.019).INTERPRETATION:Children born extremely preterm, in the absence of CP, are at risk of MND and this is associated with motor function, cognitive ability, and behaviour.WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS:Extremely preterm birth carries a risk of minor neurological dysfunction (MND). MND in children born extremely preterm is associated with impaired motor function and cognitive abilities, and behavioural problems. Male sex is associated with MND in children born extremely preterm.
0012-1622
Brostrom, Lina
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Vollmer, Brigitte
044f8b55-ba36-4fb2-8e7e-756ab77653ba
Bolk, Jenny
75195acc-b0ad-423f-bf0d-1893f2ee4371
Eklöf, Eva
91730abd-fdab-4fdf-9c4b-748e1a6360a8
Adén, Ulrika
32b79481-167d-47f1-9e38-c332da320a33
Brostrom, Lina
3d5b5a3e-9e7e-49de-a378-03baa9b8427f
Vollmer, Brigitte
044f8b55-ba36-4fb2-8e7e-756ab77653ba
Bolk, Jenny
75195acc-b0ad-423f-bf0d-1893f2ee4371
Eklöf, Eva
91730abd-fdab-4fdf-9c4b-748e1a6360a8
Adén, Ulrika
32b79481-167d-47f1-9e38-c332da320a33

Brostrom, Lina, Vollmer, Brigitte, Bolk, Jenny, Eklöf, Eva and Adén, Ulrika (2018) Minor neurological dysfunction and associations with motor function, general cognitive abilities, and behaviour in children born extremely preterm. Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology.. (doi:10.1111/dmcn.13738).

Record type: Article

Abstract

AIM:To study the prevalence of minor neurological dysfunction (MND) at 6 years of age in a cohort of children born extremely preterm without cerebral palsy (CP) and to investigate associations with motor function, cognitive abilities, and behaviour.METHOD:This study assessed 80 children born at less than 27 weeks of gestation and 90 children born at term age between 2004 and 2007 at a mean age of 6 years 6 months. The assessments included a simplified version of the Touwen Infant Neurological Examination, the Movement Assessment Battery for Children, Second Edition (MABC-2), Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, Fourth Edition (WISC-IV), the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ), and the parent version of the Five to Fifteen questionnaire.RESULTS:Fifty-one of the children born preterm had normal neurology, 23 had simple MND, and six had complex MND compared with 88 who had normal neurology and two simple MND in the term-born group (p<0.001). There were significant differences between the children with normal neurology and MND in the preterm group in MABC-2-assessed motor function (p<0.001), general cognitive abilities with WISC-IV (p=0.005), and SDQ overall behavioural problems and peer problems reported by the parents (p=0.021 and p=0.003 respectively). SDQ teacher-reported overall behavioural and hyperactivity problems were significantly different between children with normal and simple MND (p=0.036 and p=0.019).INTERPRETATION:Children born extremely preterm, in the absence of CP, are at risk of MND and this is associated with motor function, cognitive ability, and behaviour.WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS:Extremely preterm birth carries a risk of minor neurological dysfunction (MND). MND in children born extremely preterm is associated with impaired motor function and cognitive abilities, and behavioural problems. Male sex is associated with MND in children born extremely preterm.

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Accepted/In Press date: 30 January 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 24 March 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 419361
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/419361
ISSN: 0012-1622
PURE UUID: b176546a-1b58-4dbf-b13c-36f6205d5074
ORCID for Brigitte Vollmer: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4088-5336

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Date deposited: 11 Apr 2018 16:30
Last modified: 24 Mar 2019 05:01

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