The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Neoliberal abandonment in disability housing provision: a look at England and Chile

Neoliberal abandonment in disability housing provision: a look at England and Chile
Neoliberal abandonment in disability housing provision: a look at England and Chile
Public or ‘social’ housing provision in many nations in the Global North is increasingly being driven by neoliberal strategies that include austerity cuts and market-led privatisation. This context raises an important question of how likely the state’s reliance on the private sector can ensure that housing remains available and accessible to more disadvantaged low-income groups. To help answer this question, we draw on a comparative study of social housing provision for disabled people in England and Chile; two pioneers of neoliberal reform in this sector. Using interviews with key stakeholders, our findings reveal that the neoliberal reform strategies being employed have tended to dilute the statutory duties of providing accessible housing and to undermine disabled people’s choices in finding appropriate homes. Such lessons are timely and important in order to remain cognisant of the spaces of neoliberal abandonment that are leaving many people unable to gain access to appropriate housing.
housing affordability, housing allowances, social housing, accessibility, welfare state , disability
0267-3037
1-37
Power, Andrew
b3a1ee09-e381-413a-88ac-7cb3e13b3acc
Gaete-Reyes, Mariela
02c3a79b-9c70-4049-a601-f7c219a814a6
Power, Andrew
b3a1ee09-e381-413a-88ac-7cb3e13b3acc
Gaete-Reyes, Mariela
02c3a79b-9c70-4049-a601-f7c219a814a6

Power, Andrew and Gaete-Reyes, Mariela (2018) Neoliberal abandonment in disability housing provision: a look at England and Chile. Housing Studies, 1-37. (doi:10.1080/02673037.2018.1478068).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Public or ‘social’ housing provision in many nations in the Global North is increasingly being driven by neoliberal strategies that include austerity cuts and market-led privatisation. This context raises an important question of how likely the state’s reliance on the private sector can ensure that housing remains available and accessible to more disadvantaged low-income groups. To help answer this question, we draw on a comparative study of social housing provision for disabled people in England and Chile; two pioneers of neoliberal reform in this sector. Using interviews with key stakeholders, our findings reveal that the neoliberal reform strategies being employed have tended to dilute the statutory duties of providing accessible housing and to undermine disabled people’s choices in finding appropriate homes. Such lessons are timely and important in order to remain cognisant of the spaces of neoliberal abandonment that are leaving many people unable to gain access to appropriate housing.

Text
R2 Neoliberal abandonment in Housing for Disabled People - England & Chile (PURE) - Accepted Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only until 7 December 2019.
Request a copy

More information

Submitted date: 26 April 2018
Accepted/In Press date: 11 May 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 7 June 2018
Keywords: housing affordability, housing allowances, social housing, accessibility, welfare state , disability

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 420262
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/420262
ISSN: 0267-3037
PURE UUID: 66db8154-8d8e-4618-a567-91d3f5958ea7

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 03 May 2018 16:30
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 18:33

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×