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Prospective associations between parental feeding practices and children's oral processing behaviours: results from the GUSTO cohort

Prospective associations between parental feeding practices and children's oral processing behaviours: results from the GUSTO cohort
Prospective associations between parental feeding practices and children's oral processing behaviours: results from the GUSTO cohort
Previous research demonstrated that faster eating rates are linked with increased intake of energy during a meal. Here we examined whether within-meal parental feeding practices show cross-sectional and prospective associations with children’s oral processing behaviours, and whether the previously demonstrated association between faster eating rates and higher energy intakes varies by parental feeding practices. A subset (n=155) of children and their mothers from the Growing Up in Singapore Towards Healthy Outcomes cohort participated in an Ad libitum meal at age 4.5 years. Children’s oral processing behaviours (eating rate, bite size, chews per gram, oral exposure time, and meal duration) and parental feeding practices (autonomous and coercive prompts, restrictions, hurrying and slowing) were recorded during the meal. Subsequently, 94 of the children participated in a follow-up meal without their mothers at age 6 years. Parental feeding practices were not consistently associated with child oral processing behaviours overall. However, exploratory post-hoc analyses revealed some sex differences. The mothers of girls with faster eating rates, larger bite sizes and fewer chews were more likely to use hurrying, slowing and restrictions, but similar associations were not observed among boys. Children who had the most problematic eating style and were eating fast and for long, experienced more restrictions, instructions to slow down and prompts. Faster eating rates were linked with the highest energy intakes if children were additionally prompted to eat. Prospective analyses showed that children who were more often prompted using coercive techniques and less frequently hurried at age 4.5 years, had faster eating rates at 6 years and a larger increase in eating rates between ages 4.5 and 6 years, but did not consume more energy. Although the direction of these associations cannot be assumed, these exploratory analyses suggest sex differences in the associations between feeding practices and oral processing behaviours, and highlight the potential role of parents in the development of children’s oral processing behaviours.
1740-8695
Fogel, Anna
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Fries, Lisa
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McCrickerd, K.
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Goh, Ai Ting
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Chan, Mei Jun
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Toh, Jia Ying
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Chong, Yap-Seng
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Tan, Kok Hian
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Yap, Fabian
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Shek, Lynette P.
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Meaney, Michael J.
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Broekman, Birit
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Lee, Yung Seng
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Godfrey, Keith
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Chong, Mary Foong-Fong
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Forde, Ciaran G
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Fogel, Anna
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Fries, Lisa
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McCrickerd, K.
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Goh, Ai Ting
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Chan, Mei Jun
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Toh, Jia Ying
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Chong, Yap-Seng
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Tan, Kok Hian
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Yap, Fabian
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Shek, Lynette P.
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Meaney, Michael J.
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Broekman, Birit
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Lee, Yung Seng
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Godfrey, Keith
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Chong, Mary Foong-Fong
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Forde, Ciaran G
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Fogel, Anna, Fries, Lisa, McCrickerd, K., Goh, Ai Ting, Chan, Mei Jun, Toh, Jia Ying, Chong, Yap-Seng, Tan, Kok Hian, Yap, Fabian, Shek, Lynette P., Meaney, Michael J., Broekman, Birit, Lee, Yung Seng, Godfrey, Keith, Chong, Mary Foong-Fong and Forde, Ciaran G (2019) Prospective associations between parental feeding practices and children's oral processing behaviours: results from the GUSTO cohort. Maternal & Child Nutrition, 15 (1), [e12635]. (doi:10.1111/mcn.12635).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Previous research demonstrated that faster eating rates are linked with increased intake of energy during a meal. Here we examined whether within-meal parental feeding practices show cross-sectional and prospective associations with children’s oral processing behaviours, and whether the previously demonstrated association between faster eating rates and higher energy intakes varies by parental feeding practices. A subset (n=155) of children and their mothers from the Growing Up in Singapore Towards Healthy Outcomes cohort participated in an Ad libitum meal at age 4.5 years. Children’s oral processing behaviours (eating rate, bite size, chews per gram, oral exposure time, and meal duration) and parental feeding practices (autonomous and coercive prompts, restrictions, hurrying and slowing) were recorded during the meal. Subsequently, 94 of the children participated in a follow-up meal without their mothers at age 6 years. Parental feeding practices were not consistently associated with child oral processing behaviours overall. However, exploratory post-hoc analyses revealed some sex differences. The mothers of girls with faster eating rates, larger bite sizes and fewer chews were more likely to use hurrying, slowing and restrictions, but similar associations were not observed among boys. Children who had the most problematic eating style and were eating fast and for long, experienced more restrictions, instructions to slow down and prompts. Faster eating rates were linked with the highest energy intakes if children were additionally prompted to eat. Prospective analyses showed that children who were more often prompted using coercive techniques and less frequently hurried at age 4.5 years, had faster eating rates at 6 years and a larger increase in eating rates between ages 4.5 and 6 years, but did not consume more energy. Although the direction of these associations cannot be assumed, these exploratory analyses suggest sex differences in the associations between feeding practices and oral processing behaviours, and highlight the potential role of parents in the development of children’s oral processing behaviours.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 22 May 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 27 July 2018
Published date: January 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 421186
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/421186
ISSN: 1740-8695
PURE UUID: fad8c381-f86d-4224-a4d2-122c17c1993e
ORCID for Keith Godfrey: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4643-0618

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 24 May 2018 16:30
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 05:11

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Contributors

Author: Anna Fogel
Author: Lisa Fries
Author: K. McCrickerd
Author: Ai Ting Goh
Author: Mei Jun Chan
Author: Jia Ying Toh
Author: Yap-Seng Chong
Author: Kok Hian Tan
Author: Fabian Yap
Author: Lynette P. Shek
Author: Michael J. Meaney
Author: Birit Broekman
Author: Yung Seng Lee
Author: Keith Godfrey ORCID iD
Author: Mary Foong-Fong Chong
Author: Ciaran G Forde

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