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Spatiotemporal variations in rainfall and temperature in Ghana over the twentieth century, 1900-2014

Spatiotemporal variations in rainfall and temperature in Ghana over the twentieth century, 1900-2014
Spatiotemporal variations in rainfall and temperature in Ghana over the twentieth century, 1900-2014
Climate‐dependent subsistence agriculture remains the main livelihood for most populations in Ghana. The spatiotemporal variations in rainfall and temperature have influence particularly in poorly‐developed agrarian regions with limited or no irrigation infrastructure. Therefore, a systematic understanding of climate patterns across space and time is important for mitigating against food insecurity and household poverty. Using over a century of high‐spatial resolution data, this study examines the spatiotemporal variations in rainfall and temperature across Ghana to identify climate‐stressed locations with potential effect on the production of major staple crops. The data for the analysis were drawn from the University of Delaware's Gridded Precipitation and Temperature Monthly Climatology version 4.01. The analysis was restricted to the main crop‐growing periods (March to December). The Mann‐Kendall nonparametric regression test was used to examine significant changes in rainfall variability and temperature at the district level. The results show that Ghana's climate has become progressively drier over the last century and prone to drought conditions. The most climate‐stressed districts are clustered within the three northern regions (Upper West, Upper East, and Northern) and the Western region. The most recent census in Ghana shows that the three northern regions also have the highest prevalence of subsistence agriculture. The findings from this study have implications for targeted interventions such as the Ghanaian government's recent policy initiative aimed at alleviating rural poverty by encouraging youth participation in agriculture along with efforts to intensifying crop production using modern farming techniques.
2333-5084
120-132
Abbam, Tawia
a09f2d50-04ed-4a57-913f-2f669fb56982
Amoako Johnson, Fiifi
e348fd15-9fe2-472f-a701-2980b8cec4d5
Dash, Jadu
51468afb-3d56-4d3a-aace-736b63e9fac8
Padmadas, Sabu
64b6ab89-152b-48a3-838b-e9167964b508
Abbam, Tawia
a09f2d50-04ed-4a57-913f-2f669fb56982
Amoako Johnson, Fiifi
e348fd15-9fe2-472f-a701-2980b8cec4d5
Dash, Jadu
51468afb-3d56-4d3a-aace-736b63e9fac8
Padmadas, Sabu
64b6ab89-152b-48a3-838b-e9167964b508

Abbam, Tawia, Amoako Johnson, Fiifi, Dash, Jadu and Padmadas, Sabu (2018) Spatiotemporal variations in rainfall and temperature in Ghana over the twentieth century, 1900-2014. Earth and Space Science, 5 (4), 120-132. (doi:10.1002/2017EA000327).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Climate‐dependent subsistence agriculture remains the main livelihood for most populations in Ghana. The spatiotemporal variations in rainfall and temperature have influence particularly in poorly‐developed agrarian regions with limited or no irrigation infrastructure. Therefore, a systematic understanding of climate patterns across space and time is important for mitigating against food insecurity and household poverty. Using over a century of high‐spatial resolution data, this study examines the spatiotemporal variations in rainfall and temperature across Ghana to identify climate‐stressed locations with potential effect on the production of major staple crops. The data for the analysis were drawn from the University of Delaware's Gridded Precipitation and Temperature Monthly Climatology version 4.01. The analysis was restricted to the main crop‐growing periods (March to December). The Mann‐Kendall nonparametric regression test was used to examine significant changes in rainfall variability and temperature at the district level. The results show that Ghana's climate has become progressively drier over the last century and prone to drought conditions. The most climate‐stressed districts are clustered within the three northern regions (Upper West, Upper East, and Northern) and the Western region. The most recent census in Ghana shows that the three northern regions also have the highest prevalence of subsistence agriculture. The findings from this study have implications for targeted interventions such as the Ghanaian government's recent policy initiative aimed at alleviating rural poverty by encouraging youth participation in agriculture along with efforts to intensifying crop production using modern farming techniques.

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Abbam_et_al-2018-Earth_and_Space_Science - Version of Record
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 19 March 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 24 March 2018
Published date: April 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 421202
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/421202
ISSN: 2333-5084
PURE UUID: 032586da-b025-47c6-892c-6681f5544a6e
ORCID for Jadu Dash: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5444-2109
ORCID for Sabu Padmadas: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6538-9374

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 24 May 2018 16:30
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 01:00

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