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Arachidonic acid and DHA status in pregnant women is not associated with cognitive performance of their children at 4 or 6–7 years

Arachidonic acid and DHA status in pregnant women is not associated with cognitive performance of their children at 4 or 6–7 years
Arachidonic acid and DHA status in pregnant women is not associated with cognitive performance of their children at 4 or 6–7 years

Arachidonic acid (ARA) and DHA, supplied primarily from the mother, are required for early development of the central nervous system. Thus, variations in maternal ARA or DHA status may modify neurocognitive development. We investigated the relationship between maternal ARA and DHA status in early (11·7 weeks) or late (34·5 weeks) pregnancy on neurocognitive function at the age of 4 years or 6–7 years in 724 mother–child pairs from the Southampton Women’s Survey cohort. Plasma phosphatidylcholine fatty acid composition was measured in early and late pregnancy. ARA concentration in early pregnancy predicted 13 % of the variation in ARA concentration in late pregnancy (β=0·36, P<0·001). DHA concentration in early pregnancy predicted 21 % of the variation in DHA concentration in late pregnancy (β=0·46, P<0·001). Children’s cognitive function at the age of 4 years was assessed by the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence and at the age of 6–7 years by the Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence. Executive function at the age of 6–7 years was assessed using elements of the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery. Neither DHA nor ARA concentrations in early or late pregnancy were associated significantly with neurocognitive function in children at the age of 4 years or the age of 6–7 years. These findings suggest that ARA and DHA status during pregnancy in the range found in this cohort are unlikely to have major influences on neurocognitive function in healthy children.

Arachidonic acid, DHA, Intelligence quotient, Neurocognition, Pregnancy
0007-1145
1400-1407
Crozier, Sarah R.
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Sibbons, Charlene M.
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Fisk, Helena L.
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Godfrey, Keith M.
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Calder, Philip C.
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Gale, Catharine R.
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Robinson, Sian M.
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Inskip, Hazel M.
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Baird, Janis
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Harvey, Nicholas C.
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Cooper, Cyrus
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Burdge, Graham C.
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Southampton Women’S Survey (Sws) Study Group
Crozier, Sarah R.
9c3595ce-45b0-44fa-8c4c-4c555e628a03
Sibbons, Charlene M.
a4b07457-4adc-4157-b4e4-cebeac658381
Fisk, Helena L.
2483d346-75dd-41b3-a481-10f8bb39cd9f
Godfrey, Keith M.
0931701e-fe2c-44b5-8f0d-ec5c7477a6fd
Calder, Philip C.
1797e54f-378e-4dcb-80a4-3e30018f07a6
Gale, Catharine R.
5bb2abb3-7b53-42d6-8aa7-817e193140c8
Robinson, Sian M.
ba591c98-4380-456a-be8a-c452f992b69b
Inskip, Hazel M.
5fb4470a-9379-49b2-a533-9da8e61058b7
Baird, Janis
f4bf2039-6118-436f-ab69-df8b4d17f824
Harvey, Nicholas C.
ce487fb4-d360-4aac-9d17-9466d6cba145
Cooper, Cyrus
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Burdge, Graham C.
09d60a07-8ca1-4351-9bf1-de6ffcfb2159

Crozier, Sarah R., Sibbons, Charlene M., Fisk, Helena L., Godfrey, Keith M., Calder, Philip C., Gale, Catharine R., Robinson, Sian M., Inskip, Hazel M., Baird, Janis, Harvey, Nicholas C., Cooper, Cyrus and Burdge, Graham C. , Southampton Women’S Survey (Sws) Study Group (2018) Arachidonic acid and DHA status in pregnant women is not associated with cognitive performance of their children at 4 or 6–7 years. British Journal of Nutrition, 119 (12), 1400-1407. (doi:10.1017/S0007114518000806).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Arachidonic acid (ARA) and DHA, supplied primarily from the mother, are required for early development of the central nervous system. Thus, variations in maternal ARA or DHA status may modify neurocognitive development. We investigated the relationship between maternal ARA and DHA status in early (11·7 weeks) or late (34·5 weeks) pregnancy on neurocognitive function at the age of 4 years or 6–7 years in 724 mother–child pairs from the Southampton Women’s Survey cohort. Plasma phosphatidylcholine fatty acid composition was measured in early and late pregnancy. ARA concentration in early pregnancy predicted 13 % of the variation in ARA concentration in late pregnancy (β=0·36, P<0·001). DHA concentration in early pregnancy predicted 21 % of the variation in DHA concentration in late pregnancy (β=0·46, P<0·001). Children’s cognitive function at the age of 4 years was assessed by the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence and at the age of 6–7 years by the Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence. Executive function at the age of 6–7 years was assessed using elements of the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery. Neither DHA nor ARA concentrations in early or late pregnancy were associated significantly with neurocognitive function in children at the age of 4 years or the age of 6–7 years. These findings suggest that ARA and DHA status during pregnancy in the range found in this cohort are unlikely to have major influences on neurocognitive function in healthy children.

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Accepted/In Press date: 5 March 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 8 May 2018
Published date: 1 June 2018
Keywords: Arachidonic acid, DHA, Intelligence quotient, Neurocognition, Pregnancy

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 421430
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/421430
ISSN: 0007-1145
PURE UUID: a4f2f81d-cbc9-44d0-95e2-d5e57d2ff330
ORCID for Sarah R. Crozier: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-9524-1127
ORCID for Helena L. Fisk: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-9534-3246
ORCID for Keith M. Godfrey: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4643-0618
ORCID for Philip C. Calder: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6038-710X
ORCID for Catharine R. Gale: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3361-8638
ORCID for Sian M. Robinson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1766-7269
ORCID for Hazel M. Inskip: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-8897-1749
ORCID for Janis Baird: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4039-4361
ORCID for Nicholas C. Harvey: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8194-2512
ORCID for Cyrus Cooper: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3510-0709
ORCID for Graham C. Burdge: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7665-2967

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 11 Jun 2018 16:30
Last modified: 22 Nov 2021 06:26

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Contributors

Author: Charlene M. Sibbons
Author: Helena L. Fisk ORCID iD
Author: Sian M. Robinson ORCID iD
Author: Hazel M. Inskip ORCID iD
Author: Janis Baird ORCID iD
Author: Cyrus Cooper ORCID iD
Corporate Author: Southampton Women’S Survey (Sws) Study Group

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