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Study of railway curve squeal in the time domain using a high-frequency vehicle/track interaction model

Study of railway curve squeal in the time domain using a high-frequency vehicle/track interaction model
Study of railway curve squeal in the time domain using a high-frequency vehicle/track interaction model

Railway curve squeal is an intense tonal and annoying type of noise commonly attributed to self-excited vibrations during curving. The mechanisms for its generation remain unclear and it is still a subject of discussion among researchers. Most of them have considered the falling behaviour of the friction coefficient with the slip velocity essential for reenergising the system. Recently, some authors have found that squeal can also appear even for constant friction coefficient through the wheel modal coupling between the normal and tangential directions caused by the wheel/rail contact. This paper particularly evaluates whether the latter mechanism is sufficient to find squeal in curving conditions. The introduction of flexibility in the railway subsystems is required to widen the domain to the high-frequency range in which squeal occurs. One single flexible and rotatory wheelset is considered and suitable forces are prescribed at the primary suspension seats in the current investigation. The rails are modelled through the Moving Element Method (MEM), permitting to extend the range of validity of beam models usually utilised in the literature. This work extends the formulation to rails supported by a viscoelastic Winkler bedding. Both wheelset and track models are coupled by means of a non-linear and unsteady wheel/rail contact model based on Kalker's Variational Theory. Simulation results for different track curvatures and friction coefficients are presented and discussed, showing tonal peaks in the tangential contact forces of the inner wheel. These results can be associated with squeal according to the characterisation of this phenomenon, indicating that squeal can be found in curving conditions using advanced dynamic interaction models even with constant friction coefficient.

Curve squeal, Moving element method, Railway high-frequency dynamics, Rotating wheelset, Wheel/rail contact
0022-460X
177-191
Giner-Navarro, J.
56fdf097-c864-40de-9665-282522adb35e
Martínez-Casas, J.
0dc0fd56-e99b-4fb3-a20d-029ef73b0fd7
Denia, F. D.
5a64479b-10d6-482b-8f25-dc5b4ef39780
Baeza, L.
09dc5565-ad4b-49af-a104-d4b6ad28e1b0
Giner-Navarro, J.
56fdf097-c864-40de-9665-282522adb35e
Martínez-Casas, J.
0dc0fd56-e99b-4fb3-a20d-029ef73b0fd7
Denia, F. D.
5a64479b-10d6-482b-8f25-dc5b4ef39780
Baeza, L.
09dc5565-ad4b-49af-a104-d4b6ad28e1b0

Giner-Navarro, J., Martínez-Casas, J., Denia, F. D. and Baeza, L. (2018) Study of railway curve squeal in the time domain using a high-frequency vehicle/track interaction model. Journal of Sound and Vibration, 431, 177-191. (doi:10.1016/j.jsv.2018.06.004).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Railway curve squeal is an intense tonal and annoying type of noise commonly attributed to self-excited vibrations during curving. The mechanisms for its generation remain unclear and it is still a subject of discussion among researchers. Most of them have considered the falling behaviour of the friction coefficient with the slip velocity essential for reenergising the system. Recently, some authors have found that squeal can also appear even for constant friction coefficient through the wheel modal coupling between the normal and tangential directions caused by the wheel/rail contact. This paper particularly evaluates whether the latter mechanism is sufficient to find squeal in curving conditions. The introduction of flexibility in the railway subsystems is required to widen the domain to the high-frequency range in which squeal occurs. One single flexible and rotatory wheelset is considered and suitable forces are prescribed at the primary suspension seats in the current investigation. The rails are modelled through the Moving Element Method (MEM), permitting to extend the range of validity of beam models usually utilised in the literature. This work extends the formulation to rails supported by a viscoelastic Winkler bedding. Both wheelset and track models are coupled by means of a non-linear and unsteady wheel/rail contact model based on Kalker's Variational Theory. Simulation results for different track curvatures and friction coefficients are presented and discussed, showing tonal peaks in the tangential contact forces of the inner wheel. These results can be associated with squeal according to the characterisation of this phenomenon, indicating that squeal can be found in curving conditions using advanced dynamic interaction models even with constant friction coefficient.

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Accepted/In Press date: 3 June 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 13 June 2018
Published date: 29 September 2018
Keywords: Curve squeal, Moving element method, Railway high-frequency dynamics, Rotating wheelset, Wheel/rail contact

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 421771
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/421771
ISSN: 0022-460X
PURE UUID: 061a06ae-f7c7-454d-8445-88dbfc23cad0
ORCID for L. Baeza: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3815-8706

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Date deposited: 27 Jun 2018 16:30
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 06:42

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Contributors

Author: J. Giner-Navarro
Author: J. Martínez-Casas
Author: F. D. Denia
Author: L. Baeza ORCID iD

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