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Growth and body composition of children aged 2-4 years after exposure to community mobilisation women's group in Bangladesh

Growth and body composition of children aged 2-4 years after exposure to community mobilisation women's group in Bangladesh
Growth and body composition of children aged 2-4 years after exposure to community mobilisation women's group in Bangladesh
Background: Women’s groups interventions in Bangladesh reduced neonatal deaths by 38% and improved hygienic delivery, newborn care practices and breast feeding. We explore the longer-term impact of exposure to women’s groups during pregnancy on child growth at 2–4 years.

Methods: We performed a cross-sectional survey of child anthropometric measures (analysed as z-scores) among children born to women who had participated in the women’s groups interventions while pregnant, compared with an age-matched and sex-matched sample of children born to control mothers. Results were stratified by maternal body mass index (BMI) and adjusted for possible confounding effects of maternal education, household asset ownership and, in a separate model, mother-child height difference, a proxy for improved survival of small babies in intervention groups.

Results: Data were obtained from 2587 mother-child pairs (91% response). After adjustment for asset ownership, maternal education and potential survival effects, children whose mothers were exposed to the women’s group intervention had higher head (0.16 (0.04 to 0.28)), mid-upper arm (0.11 (0.04 to 0.19)), abdominal (0.13 (0.00 to 0.26)) and chest (0.18 (0.08 to 0.29)) circumferences than their control counterparts. No significant differences in subcutaneous fat (subscapular and triceps skinfold thickness) were observed. When stratified by maternal BMI, intervention children had higher weight, BMI and circumferences, and these effects decreased with increasing maternal BMI category.

Conclusions: Women’s groups appear to have had a lasting, positive impact on child anthropometric outcomes, with most significant results clustering in children of underweight mothers. Observed differences are likely to be of public health significance in terms of the nutritional and metabolic development of children.
0143-005X
Fottrell, E.
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Ahmed, N.
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Nahar, B.
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Shaha, S.K.
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Kuddus, A.
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Grijalva-Eternod, C.S.
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Nahar, T.
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Fall, C.
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Osmond, C.
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Govoni, V.
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Finer, S.
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Yajnik, C.S.
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Khan, A.K.A.
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Costello, A.
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Azad, A.K.
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Hitman, G.A.
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Fottrell, E.
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Ahmed, N.
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Nahar, B.
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Shaha, S.K.
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Kuddus, A.
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Grijalva-Eternod, C.S.
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Nahar, T.
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Fall, C.
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Osmond, C.
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Govoni, V.
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Finer, S.
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Yajnik, C.S.
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Khan, A.K.A.
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Costello, A.
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Azad, A.K.
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Hitman, G.A.
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Fottrell, E., Ahmed, N., Nahar, B., Shaha, S.K., Kuddus, A., Grijalva-Eternod, C.S., Nahar, T., Fall, C., Osmond, C., Govoni, V., Finer, S., Yajnik, C.S., Khan, A.K.A., Costello, A., Azad, A.K. and Hitman, G.A. (2018) Growth and body composition of children aged 2-4 years after exposure to community mobilisation women's group in Bangladesh. Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health. (doi:10.1136/jech-2017-210134).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: Women’s groups interventions in Bangladesh reduced neonatal deaths by 38% and improved hygienic delivery, newborn care practices and breast feeding. We explore the longer-term impact of exposure to women’s groups during pregnancy on child growth at 2–4 years.

Methods: We performed a cross-sectional survey of child anthropometric measures (analysed as z-scores) among children born to women who had participated in the women’s groups interventions while pregnant, compared with an age-matched and sex-matched sample of children born to control mothers. Results were stratified by maternal body mass index (BMI) and adjusted for possible confounding effects of maternal education, household asset ownership and, in a separate model, mother-child height difference, a proxy for improved survival of small babies in intervention groups.

Results: Data were obtained from 2587 mother-child pairs (91% response). After adjustment for asset ownership, maternal education and potential survival effects, children whose mothers were exposed to the women’s group intervention had higher head (0.16 (0.04 to 0.28)), mid-upper arm (0.11 (0.04 to 0.19)), abdominal (0.13 (0.00 to 0.26)) and chest (0.18 (0.08 to 0.29)) circumferences than their control counterparts. No significant differences in subcutaneous fat (subscapular and triceps skinfold thickness) were observed. When stratified by maternal BMI, intervention children had higher weight, BMI and circumferences, and these effects decreased with increasing maternal BMI category.

Conclusions: Women’s groups appear to have had a lasting, positive impact on child anthropometric outcomes, with most significant results clustering in children of underweight mothers. Observed differences are likely to be of public health significance in terms of the nutritional and metabolic development of children.

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Accepted/In Press date: 16 May 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 15 June 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 421932
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/421932
ISSN: 0143-005X
PURE UUID: 4a536eb7-6887-4643-9bbd-e832658080fb
ORCID for C. Osmond: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-9054-4655

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Date deposited: 11 Jul 2018 16:30
Last modified: 03 Dec 2019 02:01

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Contributors

Author: E. Fottrell
Author: N. Ahmed
Author: B. Nahar
Author: S.K. Shaha
Author: A. Kuddus
Author: C.S. Grijalva-Eternod
Author: T. Nahar
Author: C. Fall
Author: C. Osmond ORCID iD
Author: V. Govoni
Author: S. Finer
Author: C.S. Yajnik
Author: A.K.A. Khan
Author: A. Costello
Author: A.K. Azad
Author: G.A. Hitman

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