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The prevalence of sarcopenia and relationships between muscle and bone in ageing West-African Gambian men and women

The prevalence of sarcopenia and relationships between muscle and bone in ageing West-African Gambian men and women
The prevalence of sarcopenia and relationships between muscle and bone in ageing West-African Gambian men and women
Background: the rapidly rising ageing population in low and middle-income countries (LMIC) will lead to a concurrent increase in musculoskeletal diseases. Sarcopenia is a disease caused by progressive loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength, leading to adverse outcomes including frailty, falls, fractures and premature mortality. We investigated the prevalence of sarcopenia, assessed the suitability of current diagnostic guidelines and explored muscle-bone relationships in ageing men and women from rural Gambia.

Methods: 249 women and 239 men aged 40-75+ years were recruited. Body composition was measured using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. Comparisons of the Foundations for the National Institutes of Health (FNIH) and European Working Group On Sarcopenia (EWGSOP) definitions of sarcopenia to define prevalence and to identify poor physical capability were determined. Functional ability was assessed by jumping mechanography to calculate lower limb muscle force and power; grip strength was assessed by a hand dynamometer. Peripheral quantitative computed tomography was used to assess muscle-bone relationships.

Results: the prevalence of sarcopenia in Gambian men and women significantly varied depending on the definition used; in men 20%, 19% and in women 45%, 10% for FNIH and EWGSOP respectively. The FNIH appendicular lean mass cut-off had greatest sensitivity and specificity in identifying low functional ability in Gambian adults. Muscle force was positively associated with measures of tibial bone size, strength and mineral content.

Conclusion: the variation in the prevalence of sarcopenia depends on the definition used and highlights the importance of measuring functional capability across ethnic populations.
2190-5991
Zengin, Ayse
b2023a08-983d-45bc-ba35-02b5e08aaaa3
Jarjou, Landing M.
ca2935b3-3c0d-4541-bff7-afd191cf502b
Prentice, Ann
675810ad-8022-453c-b3a3-8afff0e1a920
Cooper, Cyrus
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Ebeling, Peter R
71a1d109-c0fe-438d-9d01-660012eb7049
Ward, Kathryn
39bd4db1-c948-4e32-930e-7bec8deb54c7
Zengin, Ayse
b2023a08-983d-45bc-ba35-02b5e08aaaa3
Jarjou, Landing M.
ca2935b3-3c0d-4541-bff7-afd191cf502b
Prentice, Ann
675810ad-8022-453c-b3a3-8afff0e1a920
Cooper, Cyrus
e05f5612-b493-4273-9b71-9e0ce32bdad6
Ebeling, Peter R
71a1d109-c0fe-438d-9d01-660012eb7049
Ward, Kathryn
39bd4db1-c948-4e32-930e-7bec8deb54c7

Zengin, Ayse, Jarjou, Landing M., Prentice, Ann, Cooper, Cyrus, Ebeling, Peter R and Ward, Kathryn (2018) The prevalence of sarcopenia and relationships between muscle and bone in ageing West-African Gambian men and women. Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle. (doi:10.1002/jcsm.12341).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: the rapidly rising ageing population in low and middle-income countries (LMIC) will lead to a concurrent increase in musculoskeletal diseases. Sarcopenia is a disease caused by progressive loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength, leading to adverse outcomes including frailty, falls, fractures and premature mortality. We investigated the prevalence of sarcopenia, assessed the suitability of current diagnostic guidelines and explored muscle-bone relationships in ageing men and women from rural Gambia.

Methods: 249 women and 239 men aged 40-75+ years were recruited. Body composition was measured using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. Comparisons of the Foundations for the National Institutes of Health (FNIH) and European Working Group On Sarcopenia (EWGSOP) definitions of sarcopenia to define prevalence and to identify poor physical capability were determined. Functional ability was assessed by jumping mechanography to calculate lower limb muscle force and power; grip strength was assessed by a hand dynamometer. Peripheral quantitative computed tomography was used to assess muscle-bone relationships.

Results: the prevalence of sarcopenia in Gambian men and women significantly varied depending on the definition used; in men 20%, 19% and in women 45%, 10% for FNIH and EWGSOP respectively. The FNIH appendicular lean mass cut-off had greatest sensitivity and specificity in identifying low functional ability in Gambian adults. Muscle force was positively associated with measures of tibial bone size, strength and mineral content.

Conclusion: the variation in the prevalence of sarcopenia depends on the definition used and highlights the importance of measuring functional capability across ethnic populations.

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GamBAS muscle and bone_Final_JCSM_revised_with_tables_figures - Accepted Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only until 2 July 2020.
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Accepted/In Press date: 2 July 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 16 September 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 422620
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/422620
ISSN: 2190-5991
PURE UUID: 1e0d63f3-ef74-4202-9d20-55b1deee5d06
ORCID for Cyrus Cooper: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3510-0709
ORCID for Kathryn Ward: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-7034-6750

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Date deposited: 26 Jul 2018 16:30
Last modified: 10 Dec 2019 01:53

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Contributors

Author: Ayse Zengin
Author: Landing M. Jarjou
Author: Ann Prentice
Author: Cyrus Cooper ORCID iD
Author: Peter R Ebeling
Author: Kathryn Ward ORCID iD

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