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Designing the blood supply chain: How much, how and where?

Designing the blood supply chain: How much, how and where?
Designing the blood supply chain: How much, how and where?
BACKGROUND: The blood supply chain network can take many forms in different settings, depending on local factors such as geography, politics, costs, etc.; however, many developed countries are moving towards centralized facilities. The goal for all blood distribution networks, regardless of design, remains the same: to satisfy demand at minimal cost and minimal wastage.

STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Mathematically, the blood supply system design can be viewed as a location-allocation problem, where the aim is to find the optimal location of facilities and to assign hospitals to them to minimize total system cost. However, most location-allocation models in the blood supply chain modeling literature omit important aspects of the problem, such as selecting amongst differing methods of collection and production. In this paper, we present a location-allocation model that takes these factors into account to support strategic decision-making at different levels of centralization.

RESULTS: Our approach is illustrated by a case study (Colombia) to redesign the national blood supply chain under a range of realistic travel time limitations. For each scenario, an optimal supply chain configuration is obtained, together with optimal collection and production strategies. We show that the total costs for the most centralized scenario are around 40% of the costs for the least centralized scenario.

CONCLUSION: Centralized systems are more efficient than decentralized systems. However, the latter may be preferred for political or geographical reasons. Our model allows decision-makers to redesign the supply network per local circumstances, and determine optimal collection and production strategies that minimize total costs.
0042-9007
760-769
Osorio Muriel, Andres
26b91481-7f68-4fea-90f8-4b3e027d7959
Brailsford, Sally
634585ff-c828-46ca-b33d-7ac017dda04f
Smith, Honora
1eaef6a6-4b9c-4997-9163-137b956c06b5
Blake, John
172c6457-63e2-4647-a13c-08144d6c0f98
Osorio Muriel, Andres
26b91481-7f68-4fea-90f8-4b3e027d7959
Brailsford, Sally
634585ff-c828-46ca-b33d-7ac017dda04f
Smith, Honora
1eaef6a6-4b9c-4997-9163-137b956c06b5
Blake, John
172c6457-63e2-4647-a13c-08144d6c0f98

Osorio Muriel, Andres, Brailsford, Sally, Smith, Honora and Blake, John (2018) Designing the blood supply chain: How much, how and where? Vox Sanguinis, 113 (8), 760-769. (doi:10.1111/vox.12706).

Record type: Article

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The blood supply chain network can take many forms in different settings, depending on local factors such as geography, politics, costs, etc.; however, many developed countries are moving towards centralized facilities. The goal for all blood distribution networks, regardless of design, remains the same: to satisfy demand at minimal cost and minimal wastage.

STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Mathematically, the blood supply system design can be viewed as a location-allocation problem, where the aim is to find the optimal location of facilities and to assign hospitals to them to minimize total system cost. However, most location-allocation models in the blood supply chain modeling literature omit important aspects of the problem, such as selecting amongst differing methods of collection and production. In this paper, we present a location-allocation model that takes these factors into account to support strategic decision-making at different levels of centralization.

RESULTS: Our approach is illustrated by a case study (Colombia) to redesign the national blood supply chain under a range of realistic travel time limitations. For each scenario, an optimal supply chain configuration is obtained, together with optimal collection and production strategies. We show that the total costs for the most centralized scenario are around 40% of the costs for the least centralized scenario.

CONCLUSION: Centralized systems are more efficient than decentralized systems. However, the latter may be preferred for political or geographical reasons. Our model allows decision-makers to redesign the supply network per local circumstances, and determine optimal collection and production strategies that minimize total costs.

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Osorio et al revised - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 6 August 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 4 September 2018
Published date: November 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 422861
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/422861
ISSN: 0042-9007
PURE UUID: 54603ced-18d3-4acc-95da-77c73d9e840d
ORCID for Sally Brailsford: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6665-8230
ORCID for Honora Smith: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4974-3011

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 07 Aug 2018 16:30
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 05:30

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Contributors

Author: Andres Osorio Muriel
Author: Honora Smith ORCID iD
Author: John Blake

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