The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository
Warning ePrints Soton is experiencing an issue with some file downloads not being available. We are working hard to fix this. Please bear with us.

Socio-economic differentials in minimum dietary diversity among young children in South-East Asia: evidence from demographic and health surveys

Socio-economic differentials in minimum dietary diversity among young children in South-East Asia: evidence from demographic and health surveys
Socio-economic differentials in minimum dietary diversity among young children in South-East Asia: evidence from demographic and health surveys
Objective To investigate the socioeconomic differentials underlying Minimum Dietary Diversity (MDD) among children aged 6-23 months in three economically-diverse Southeast Asian countries.

Design The outcome variable MDD was defined as the proportion of children aged 6 to 23 months who received foods from four of the seven recommended food groups within the 24 hours prior to interview. The association between socioeconomic factors and MDD, adjusting for relevant characteristics, was examined using logistic regression.

Setting We used cross-sectional population data from recent Demographic and Health Surveys from Cambodia (2014), Myanmar (2015-16) and Indonesia (2012).

Subjects Total of 8,364 children aged 6-23 months.

Results Approximately half of all children met the MDD, varying from 47.7% in Cambodia (n=1,023), 58.2% in Indonesia (n=2,907) and 24.6% in Myanmar (n=301). The likelihood of meeting MDD increased for children in the richest households (Cambodia (aOR: 2.4, 95%CI: 1.7-3.4), Myanmar (aOR: 1.8, 95%CI: 1.1-3.0), Indonesia (aOR: 2.0, 95%CI: 1.6-2.5)), and those residing in urban areas (Cambodia (aOR: 1.4, 95%CI: 1.1-1.9), Myanmar (aOR: 1.7, 95%CI: 1.2-2.4), Indonesia (aOR: 1.7, 95%CI: 1.5-1.9)). MDD deprivation was most severe amongst children from the poorest households in rural areas. The association between mother’s labour force participation and MDD was positive in all three countries, but reached significance only in Indonesia (aOR: 1.3; 95%CI: 1.1, 1.5).

Conclusions MDD deprivation among young children was significantly high in socioeconomically disadvantaged families in all three study settings. MDD requirements are not being met for approximately half of young children in these three Southeast Asian countries.
1368-9800
Harvey, Chloe M.
e69b10a8-85f5-4eeb-9932-4e92a59a097c
Newell, Marie-Louise
c6ff99dd-c23b-4fef-a846-a221fe2522b3
Padmadas, Sabu
64b6ab89-152b-48a3-838b-e9167964b508
Harvey, Chloe M.
e69b10a8-85f5-4eeb-9932-4e92a59a097c
Newell, Marie-Louise
c6ff99dd-c23b-4fef-a846-a221fe2522b3
Padmadas, Sabu
64b6ab89-152b-48a3-838b-e9167964b508

Harvey, Chloe M., Newell, Marie-Louise and Padmadas, Sabu (2018) Socio-economic differentials in minimum dietary diversity among young children in South-East Asia: evidence from demographic and health surveys. Public Health Nutrition. (doi:10.1017/S1368980018002173).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objective To investigate the socioeconomic differentials underlying Minimum Dietary Diversity (MDD) among children aged 6-23 months in three economically-diverse Southeast Asian countries.

Design The outcome variable MDD was defined as the proportion of children aged 6 to 23 months who received foods from four of the seven recommended food groups within the 24 hours prior to interview. The association between socioeconomic factors and MDD, adjusting for relevant characteristics, was examined using logistic regression.

Setting We used cross-sectional population data from recent Demographic and Health Surveys from Cambodia (2014), Myanmar (2015-16) and Indonesia (2012).

Subjects Total of 8,364 children aged 6-23 months.

Results Approximately half of all children met the MDD, varying from 47.7% in Cambodia (n=1,023), 58.2% in Indonesia (n=2,907) and 24.6% in Myanmar (n=301). The likelihood of meeting MDD increased for children in the richest households (Cambodia (aOR: 2.4, 95%CI: 1.7-3.4), Myanmar (aOR: 1.8, 95%CI: 1.1-3.0), Indonesia (aOR: 2.0, 95%CI: 1.6-2.5)), and those residing in urban areas (Cambodia (aOR: 1.4, 95%CI: 1.1-1.9), Myanmar (aOR: 1.7, 95%CI: 1.2-2.4), Indonesia (aOR: 1.7, 95%CI: 1.5-1.9)). MDD deprivation was most severe amongst children from the poorest households in rural areas. The association between mother’s labour force participation and MDD was positive in all three countries, but reached significance only in Indonesia (aOR: 1.3; 95%CI: 1.1, 1.5).

Conclusions MDD deprivation among young children was significantly high in socioeconomically disadvantaged families in all three study settings. MDD requirements are not being met for approximately half of young children in these three Southeast Asian countries.

Text
Revision - Accepted Manuscript
Download (131kB)
Text
Revision-PHN-RES-2018-0207-ACCEPTED - Accepted Manuscript
Download (130kB)
Text
socioeconomic_differentials_in_minimum_dietary_diversity_among_young_children_in_southeast_asia_evidence_from_demographic_and_health_surveys - Version of Record
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.
Download (800kB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 31 July 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 4 September 2018
Published date: 4 September 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 422934
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/422934
ISSN: 1368-9800
PURE UUID: 1d9afbb3-b6e5-476f-a37f-113057aa51a2
ORCID for Marie-Louise Newell: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1074-7699
ORCID for Sabu Padmadas: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6538-9374

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 08 Aug 2018 16:30
Last modified: 22 Nov 2021 06:38

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Chloe M. Harvey
Author: Sabu Padmadas ORCID iD

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×