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After the treaties: a social, economic and demographic history of Maroon society in Jamaica, 1739-1842

After the treaties: a social, economic and demographic history of Maroon society in Jamaica, 1739-1842
After the treaties: a social, economic and demographic history of Maroon society in Jamaica, 1739-1842
This study is built on an investigation of a large number of archival sources, but in particular the Journals and Votes of the House of the Assembly of Jamaica, drawn from resources in Britain and Jamaica. Using data drawn from these primary sources, I assess how the Maroons of Jamaica forged an identity for themselves in the century under slavery following the peace treaties of 1739 and 1740. I will argue that the story of the Maroons of Jamaica is more complicated than previously thought.

First, I analyse the origins of the Maroons, and the circumstances that led to them signing peace treaties with the colonial authorities. Second, I consider how the white superintendents usurped the authority of the Maroons in five official towns. Third, I scrutinize the Maroon response to the requirements of the treaties concerning suppressing slave revolts and hunting runaway slaves. Fourth, I examine the relationship between Trelawny Town and the colonial authorities. This allows me to demonstrate that while the colonial elite made concessions over land disputes with other Maroon towns, their reluctance to do so with Trelawny Town eventually culminated in the Second Maroon War of 1795-6. Fifth, I consider the relationship between Trelawny Town and runaway slaves, and the effect it had on the rise in runaway communities in western Jamaica in the nineteenth century. Finally, I explore the changing relationship between the Maroons remaining in Jamaica and the colonial authorities in the aftermath of the Second Maroon War.

As a whole, my PhD challenges the simplistic view of the Maroons as collaborators, and argues that their story was a complex one of divisions between Maroon towns, a lack of coherence, and they were often inefficient hunters of runaways. The Maroons sometimes collaborated with the colonial authorities, and then assisted runaways to escape during the Second Maroon War.
University of Southampton
Sivapragasam, Michael
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Sivapragasam, Michael
d5ea8e64-9098-4e9c-ae50-d375cc57d4d9
Petley, Christer
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Herrmann, Rachel B
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Paul, Helen
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Talbot, Ian
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Sivapragasam, Michael (2018) After the treaties: a social, economic and demographic history of Maroon society in Jamaica, 1739-1842. University of Southampton, Doctoral Thesis, 307pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

This study is built on an investigation of a large number of archival sources, but in particular the Journals and Votes of the House of the Assembly of Jamaica, drawn from resources in Britain and Jamaica. Using data drawn from these primary sources, I assess how the Maroons of Jamaica forged an identity for themselves in the century under slavery following the peace treaties of 1739 and 1740. I will argue that the story of the Maroons of Jamaica is more complicated than previously thought.

First, I analyse the origins of the Maroons, and the circumstances that led to them signing peace treaties with the colonial authorities. Second, I consider how the white superintendents usurped the authority of the Maroons in five official towns. Third, I scrutinize the Maroon response to the requirements of the treaties concerning suppressing slave revolts and hunting runaway slaves. Fourth, I examine the relationship between Trelawny Town and the colonial authorities. This allows me to demonstrate that while the colonial elite made concessions over land disputes with other Maroon towns, their reluctance to do so with Trelawny Town eventually culminated in the Second Maroon War of 1795-6. Fifth, I consider the relationship between Trelawny Town and runaway slaves, and the effect it had on the rise in runaway communities in western Jamaica in the nineteenth century. Finally, I explore the changing relationship between the Maroons remaining in Jamaica and the colonial authorities in the aftermath of the Second Maroon War.

As a whole, my PhD challenges the simplistic view of the Maroons as collaborators, and argues that their story was a complex one of divisions between Maroon towns, a lack of coherence, and they were often inefficient hunters of runaways. The Maroons sometimes collaborated with the colonial authorities, and then assisted runaways to escape during the Second Maroon War.

Text
After The Treaties Final - Version of Record
Available under License University of Southampton Thesis Licence.
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Published date: June 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 423482
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/423482
PURE UUID: 48dfafb6-84a3-4b8c-90ad-483a60e6a997
ORCID for Christer Petley: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0616-1871
ORCID for Helen Paul: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4786-7192

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 24 Sep 2018 16:30
Last modified: 06 Aug 2019 00:32

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Contributors

Author: Michael Sivapragasam
Thesis advisor: Christer Petley ORCID iD
Thesis advisor: Rachel B Herrmann
Thesis advisor: Helen Paul ORCID iD
Thesis advisor: Ian Talbot

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