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Sleep in youth with Autism Spectrum Disorders: systematic review and meta-analysis

Sleep in youth with Autism Spectrum Disorders: systematic review and meta-analysis
Sleep in youth with Autism Spectrum Disorders: systematic review and meta-analysis
Questions: sleep problems are common and impairing in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Evidence synthesis including both subjective (i.e., measured with questionnaires) and objective (i.e., quantified with neurophysiologic tools) sleep alterations in youth with ASD is currently lacking. Therefore, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of subjective and objective studies sleep studies in youth with ASD.

Study selection and analysis: we searched the following electronic databases with no language, date, or type of document restriction, up to May 23rd, 2018: Pubmed, PsycInfo, Embase+Embase Classic, Ovid Medline, and Web of Knowledge. Random-effects models were used. Heterogeneity was assessed with Cochran's Q and I2 statistics. Publication (small studies) bias was assessed with final plots and the Egger’s test. Study quality was evaluated with the Newcastle Ottawa Scale. Analyses were conducted using Review Manager and Comprehensive meta-analysis.

Findings: from a pool of 3,359 non-duplicate potentially relevant references, 47 datasets were included in the meta-analyses. Subjective and objective sleep outcome measures were extracted from 37 and 15 studies, respectively. Only five studies were based on comorbidity free, medication-naïve participants. Compared to typically developing controls, youth with ASD significantly differed in 10/14 subjective parameters and in 7/14 objective sleep parameters. The average quality score in the Newcastle-Ottawa scale was 5.9/9. CONCLUSIONS: A number of subjective and, to a less extent, objective sleep alterations might characterise youth with ASD, but future studies should assess the impact of pharmacological treatment and psychiatric comorbidities.
1362-0347
146-154
Diaz Roman, Amparo
47ad1105-3105-4a04-a4d1-f17eb8a36596
Zhang, Junhua
0e084511-6f1c-4c1b-8b1b-971a840955d6
Delorme, Richard
d949be49-fea2-48cb-aefa-f635926d2259
Beggiato, Anita
6cc00064-b08a-4773-8924-0dd82850285a
Cortese, Samuele
53d4bf2c-4e0e-4c77-9385-218350560fdb
Diaz Roman, Amparo
47ad1105-3105-4a04-a4d1-f17eb8a36596
Zhang, Junhua
0e084511-6f1c-4c1b-8b1b-971a840955d6
Delorme, Richard
d949be49-fea2-48cb-aefa-f635926d2259
Beggiato, Anita
6cc00064-b08a-4773-8924-0dd82850285a
Cortese, Samuele
53d4bf2c-4e0e-4c77-9385-218350560fdb

Diaz Roman, Amparo, Zhang, Junhua, Delorme, Richard, Beggiato, Anita and Cortese, Samuele (2018) Sleep in youth with Autism Spectrum Disorders: systematic review and meta-analysis. Evidence-Based Mental Health, 21 (4), 146-154. (doi:10.1136/ebmental-2018-300037).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Questions: sleep problems are common and impairing in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Evidence synthesis including both subjective (i.e., measured with questionnaires) and objective (i.e., quantified with neurophysiologic tools) sleep alterations in youth with ASD is currently lacking. Therefore, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of subjective and objective studies sleep studies in youth with ASD.

Study selection and analysis: we searched the following electronic databases with no language, date, or type of document restriction, up to May 23rd, 2018: Pubmed, PsycInfo, Embase+Embase Classic, Ovid Medline, and Web of Knowledge. Random-effects models were used. Heterogeneity was assessed with Cochran's Q and I2 statistics. Publication (small studies) bias was assessed with final plots and the Egger’s test. Study quality was evaluated with the Newcastle Ottawa Scale. Analyses were conducted using Review Manager and Comprehensive meta-analysis.

Findings: from a pool of 3,359 non-duplicate potentially relevant references, 47 datasets were included in the meta-analyses. Subjective and objective sleep outcome measures were extracted from 37 and 15 studies, respectively. Only five studies were based on comorbidity free, medication-naïve participants. Compared to typically developing controls, youth with ASD significantly differed in 10/14 subjective parameters and in 7/14 objective sleep parameters. The average quality score in the Newcastle-Ottawa scale was 5.9/9. CONCLUSIONS: A number of subjective and, to a less extent, objective sleep alterations might characterise youth with ASD, but future studies should assess the impact of pharmacological treatment and psychiatric comorbidities.

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Accepted/In Press date: 20 September 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 25 October 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 423553
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/423553
ISSN: 1362-0347
PURE UUID: dafea7b1-0bf6-46e4-bbf7-b6689c20f2c2
ORCID for Samuele Cortese: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5877-8075

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Date deposited: 26 Sep 2018 16:30
Last modified: 10 Dec 2019 05:12

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Contributors

Author: Amparo Diaz Roman
Author: Junhua Zhang
Author: Richard Delorme
Author: Anita Beggiato
Author: Samuele Cortese ORCID iD

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