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Paediatric inflammatory bowel disease – brief update on current practice

Paediatric inflammatory bowel disease – brief update on current practice
Paediatric inflammatory bowel disease – brief update on current practice
Paediatric inflammatory bowel disease (PIBD), consisting of Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis and inflammatory bowel disease unclassified, is a chronic inflammatory condition associated with significant morbidity. The incidence of PIBD is increasing and disease phenotype remains more severe than adult onset disease. Diagnosis of PIBD is often slow and requires referral to specialist services; however, the emergence of faecal calprotectin as a tool for prioritising further investigation, alongside improved use of treatments (including anti-TNF monoclonal antibody therapy) is changing diagnosis and management. Whilst significant challenges remain in the longer-term treatment of PIBD, including growth, nutrition and management of refractory disease there remains a strong research focus on understanding underlying disease pathogenesis and a move towards personalised medicine. This review describes investigations, diagnosis and management of PIBD and presents the most up to date evidence on nutritional and medical management.
1751-7222
Ashton, James
03369017-99b5-40ae-9a43-14c98516f37d
Batra, Akshay
822f891e-87ca-41d9-b68d-27c395e88809
Beattie, R. Mark
55d81c7b-08c9-4f42-b6d3-245869badb71
Ashton, James
03369017-99b5-40ae-9a43-14c98516f37d
Batra, Akshay
822f891e-87ca-41d9-b68d-27c395e88809
Beattie, R. Mark
55d81c7b-08c9-4f42-b6d3-245869badb71

Ashton, James, Batra, Akshay and Beattie, R. Mark (2018) Paediatric inflammatory bowel disease – brief update on current practice. Paediatrics and Child Health. (doi:10.1016/j.paed.2018.08.007).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Paediatric inflammatory bowel disease (PIBD), consisting of Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis and inflammatory bowel disease unclassified, is a chronic inflammatory condition associated with significant morbidity. The incidence of PIBD is increasing and disease phenotype remains more severe than adult onset disease. Diagnosis of PIBD is often slow and requires referral to specialist services; however, the emergence of faecal calprotectin as a tool for prioritising further investigation, alongside improved use of treatments (including anti-TNF monoclonal antibody therapy) is changing diagnosis and management. Whilst significant challenges remain in the longer-term treatment of PIBD, including growth, nutrition and management of refractory disease there remains a strong research focus on understanding underlying disease pathogenesis and a move towards personalised medicine. This review describes investigations, diagnosis and management of PIBD and presents the most up to date evidence on nutritional and medical management.

Text
JJA_AB_RMB_Paediatric inflammatory bowel disease - Accepted Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only until 8 September 2019.
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 8 September 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 22 September 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 423767
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/423767
ISSN: 1751-7222
PURE UUID: 561bdb89-56e5-43a3-99c7-ba77c7f485e4

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 01 Oct 2018 16:30
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 18:03

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Contributors

Author: James Ashton
Author: Akshay Batra
Author: R. Mark Beattie

University divisions

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