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How does the process of group singing impact on people affected by cancer?: A grounded theory study

How does the process of group singing impact on people affected by cancer?: A grounded theory study
How does the process of group singing impact on people affected by cancer?: A grounded theory study
Objective: this study aimed to build an understanding of how the process of singing impacts upon those who are affected by cancer, including patients, staff, carers and those who have been bereaved.

Design: aqualitative study, informed by a Grounded Theory approach.
Setting and participants: Cancer patients, staff, carers and bereaved who had participated for a minimum of 6 weeks in one of two choirs for people affected by cancer.

Methods: 31 participants took part in Focus Group Interviews lasting between 45 minutes and an hour, and 1 participant had a face to face interview.
Findings: Four overarching themes emerged from the iterative analysis procedure. The overarching themes were: building resilience, social support, psychological dimensions, and process issues. Following further analyses, a theoretical model was created to depict how building resilience underpins the findings.

Conclusion: group singing may be a suitable intervention for building resilience in those affected by cancer via an interaction between the experience and impact of the choir.

Strengths and limitations of this study
• This is the first grounded theory study to have been conducted to explore the impact of group singing for those affected by with cancer.
• 32 participants took part spanning patients, staff, carers and bereaved, and saturation was reached.
• This study was concerned with people affected by any type of cancer, but it remains for future studies to establish whether singing had a specific bespoke impact for people with different types of cancer.
• This study used focus group and one-to-one interviews to provide in-depth data to understand shared perspectives and individual experiences, but as no participant observations were undertaken, the behaviours of participants during the singing sessions themselves remain unstudied.
2044-6055
1-9
Warran, Katey
c43b0c90-7b20-46cf-a306-755a63609e11
Fancourt, Daisy
c2609458-943e-4c2e-a71f-ef79c0695ca9
Wiseman, Theresa
e3ff42ae-97ef-4640-af3d-40eeae830df9
Warran, Katey
c43b0c90-7b20-46cf-a306-755a63609e11
Fancourt, Daisy
c2609458-943e-4c2e-a71f-ef79c0695ca9
Wiseman, Theresa
e3ff42ae-97ef-4640-af3d-40eeae830df9

Warran, Katey, Fancourt, Daisy and Wiseman, Theresa (2019) How does the process of group singing impact on people affected by cancer?: A grounded theory study. BMJ Open, 9 (1), 1-9, [e023261]. (doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2018-023261).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objective: this study aimed to build an understanding of how the process of singing impacts upon those who are affected by cancer, including patients, staff, carers and those who have been bereaved.

Design: aqualitative study, informed by a Grounded Theory approach.
Setting and participants: Cancer patients, staff, carers and bereaved who had participated for a minimum of 6 weeks in one of two choirs for people affected by cancer.

Methods: 31 participants took part in Focus Group Interviews lasting between 45 minutes and an hour, and 1 participant had a face to face interview.
Findings: Four overarching themes emerged from the iterative analysis procedure. The overarching themes were: building resilience, social support, psychological dimensions, and process issues. Following further analyses, a theoretical model was created to depict how building resilience underpins the findings.

Conclusion: group singing may be a suitable intervention for building resilience in those affected by cancer via an interaction between the experience and impact of the choir.

Strengths and limitations of this study
• This is the first grounded theory study to have been conducted to explore the impact of group singing for those affected by with cancer.
• 32 participants took part spanning patients, staff, carers and bereaved, and saturation was reached.
• This study was concerned with people affected by any type of cancer, but it remains for future studies to establish whether singing had a specific bespoke impact for people with different types of cancer.
• This study used focus group and one-to-one interviews to provide in-depth data to understand shared perspectives and individual experiences, but as no participant observations were undertaken, the behaviours of participants during the singing sessions themselves remain unstudied.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 1 October 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 7 January 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 423850
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/423850
ISSN: 2044-6055
PURE UUID: ede72fb7-5675-46b0-8968-485da65e1b2b
ORCID for Theresa Wiseman: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3355-1269

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Date deposited: 03 Oct 2018 16:30
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 06:36

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