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Not just a migration problem: metapopulations, habitat shifts, and gene flow are also important for fishway science and management

Not just a migration problem: metapopulations, habitat shifts, and gene flow are also important for fishway science and management
Not just a migration problem: metapopulations, habitat shifts, and gene flow are also important for fishway science and management
Worldwide, fishways are increasingly criticized for failing to meet conservation goals. We argue that this is largely due to the dominance of diadromous species of the Northern Hemisphere (e.g., Salmonidae) in the research that underpins the concepts and methods of fishway science and management. With highly diverse life histories, swimming abilities and spatial ecologies, most freshwater fish species do not conform to the stereotype imposed by this framework. This is leading to a global proliferation of fishways that are often unsuitable for native species. The vast majority of fish populations do not undertake extensive migrations between clearly separated critical habitats, yet the movement of individuals and the genetic information they carry is critically important for population viability. We briefly review some of the latest advances in spatial ecological modelling for dendritic networks to better define what it means to achieve effective fish passage at a barrier. Through a combination of critical habitat assessment and the modelling of metapopulations, climate change‐driven habitat shifts, and adaptive gene flow, we recommend a conceptual and methodological framework for fishway target‐setting and monitoring suitable for a wide range of species. In the process, we raise a number of issues that should contribute to the ongoing debate about fish passage research and the design and monitoring of fishways.
1535-1459
Wilkes, M.A.
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Webb, J.A.
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Pompeu, P.S.
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Silva, L.G.M.
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Vowles, Andrew
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Baker, C.F.
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Franklin, P.
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Link, O.
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Habit, E.
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Kemp, Paul
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Wilkes, M.A.
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Webb, J.A.
e74d2c4c-9ae0-4688-8e02-dbff051bffae
Pompeu, P.S.
36e361e2-c1d2-4954-9c48-063bc53b25b4
Silva, L.G.M.
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Vowles, Andrew
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Baker, C.F.
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Franklin, P.
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Link, O.
7cce0845-3a22-420d-8ec3-c31368c0269f
Habit, E.
d7e41fe0-a380-46c5-b352-d83f98490ddf
Kemp, Paul
9e33fba6-cccf-4eb5-965b-b70e72b11cd7

Wilkes, M.A., Webb, J.A., Pompeu, P.S., Silva, L.G.M., Vowles, Andrew, Baker, C.F., Franklin, P., Link, O., Habit, E. and Kemp, Paul (2018) Not just a migration problem: metapopulations, habitat shifts, and gene flow are also important for fishway science and management. River Research and Applications. (doi:10.1002/rra.3320).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Worldwide, fishways are increasingly criticized for failing to meet conservation goals. We argue that this is largely due to the dominance of diadromous species of the Northern Hemisphere (e.g., Salmonidae) in the research that underpins the concepts and methods of fishway science and management. With highly diverse life histories, swimming abilities and spatial ecologies, most freshwater fish species do not conform to the stereotype imposed by this framework. This is leading to a global proliferation of fishways that are often unsuitable for native species. The vast majority of fish populations do not undertake extensive migrations between clearly separated critical habitats, yet the movement of individuals and the genetic information they carry is critically important for population viability. We briefly review some of the latest advances in spatial ecological modelling for dendritic networks to better define what it means to achieve effective fish passage at a barrier. Through a combination of critical habitat assessment and the modelling of metapopulations, climate change‐driven habitat shifts, and adaptive gene flow, we recommend a conceptual and methodological framework for fishway target‐setting and monitoring suitable for a wide range of species. In the process, we raise a number of issues that should contribute to the ongoing debate about fish passage research and the design and monitoring of fishways.

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Wilkes et al Fishway effectiveness RRA final accepted - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 30 May 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 9 August 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 424725
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/424725
ISSN: 1535-1459
PURE UUID: 3e7256b8-784f-4722-914c-ab1c114a0366
ORCID for Paul Kemp: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4470-0589

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Date deposited: 05 Oct 2018 11:41
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 04:28

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