The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Understanding fans’ responses to the sponsor of a rival team

Understanding fans’ responses to the sponsor of a rival team
Understanding fans’ responses to the sponsor of a rival team
Research question: What factors determine fans’ responses to the sponsor of a rival team? To what extent does higher in-group fan identification, more positive prior attitudes to the sponsor and a more congruent fit between the sponsor and club, cause denigration or mitigate negative outcomes for the sponsor?

Research methods: 300 questionnaires were collected from fans of English Premier League football teams Newcastle United and Sunderland allowed us to test our model of sponsorship responses. Structural equation modelling was used to evaluate each hypothesis.

Results and findings: Brands will gain greater benefits from sponsorships deemed to be congruent with the rival team and where a higher pre-sponsorship attitude exists. More highly identified fans tend to pay greater attention to the sponsor of their rival team. We find that schadenfreude is a better predictor of affective and behavioural responses than fan identification, despite its popularity in recent research involving rival fans.

Implications: Brand managers concerned about the size and scope of out-groups can employ our findings to more effectively configure sponsorship activities.
1618-4742
190-213
Angell, Robert
ca8389e4-2a83-43a8-b331-c262eda37674
Gorton, Matthew
c32c7dd8-19b7-48c5-89bc-8adfd63333ca
Bottomley, Paul
b825f075-8eda-4890-b524-205bf9898288
White, John
c636e743-48a5-481c-ad79-796196cddd44
Angell, Robert
ca8389e4-2a83-43a8-b331-c262eda37674
Gorton, Matthew
c32c7dd8-19b7-48c5-89bc-8adfd63333ca
Bottomley, Paul
b825f075-8eda-4890-b524-205bf9898288
White, John
c636e743-48a5-481c-ad79-796196cddd44

Angell, Robert, Gorton, Matthew, Bottomley, Paul and White, John (2016) Understanding fans’ responses to the sponsor of a rival team. European Sport Management Quarterly, 16 (2), 190-213. (doi:10.1080/16184742.2015.1135975).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Research question: What factors determine fans’ responses to the sponsor of a rival team? To what extent does higher in-group fan identification, more positive prior attitudes to the sponsor and a more congruent fit between the sponsor and club, cause denigration or mitigate negative outcomes for the sponsor?

Research methods: 300 questionnaires were collected from fans of English Premier League football teams Newcastle United and Sunderland allowed us to test our model of sponsorship responses. Structural equation modelling was used to evaluate each hypothesis.

Results and findings: Brands will gain greater benefits from sponsorships deemed to be congruent with the rival team and where a higher pre-sponsorship attitude exists. More highly identified fans tend to pay greater attention to the sponsor of their rival team. We find that schadenfreude is a better predictor of affective and behavioural responses than fan identification, despite its popularity in recent research involving rival fans.

Implications: Brand managers concerned about the size and scope of out-groups can employ our findings to more effectively configure sponsorship activities.

Text
ESMQ ANGELL et AL - Accepted Manuscript
Download (2MB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 17 December 2015
e-pub ahead of print date: 21 March 2016
Published date: 2016

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 426004
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/426004
ISSN: 1618-4742
PURE UUID: b3673f60-cd45-48cf-8196-480c09cb07d2

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 09 Nov 2018 17:30
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 17:51

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×