The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository
Warning ePrints Soton is experiencing an issue with some file downloads not being available. We are working hard to fix this. Please bear with us.

Women living with multi-morbidity in the Greater Accra region of Ghana: a qualitative study guided by the Cumulative Complexity Model

Women living with multi-morbidity in the Greater Accra region of Ghana: a qualitative study guided by the Cumulative Complexity Model
Women living with multi-morbidity in the Greater Accra region of Ghana: a qualitative study guided by the Cumulative Complexity Model
Defined as the co-occurrence of more than two chronic conditions, multi-morbidity has been described as a significant health care problem: a trend linked to a rise in non-communicable disease and an ageing population. Evidence on the experiences of living with multi-morbidity in middle-income countries (MICs) is limited. In high-income countries (HICs), multi-morbidity has a complex impact on health outcomes, including functional status, disability and quality of life, complexity of health care and burden of treatment. Previous evidence also shows that multi-morbidity is consistently higher amongst women.
This study aimed to explore the perceptions and experiences of women living with multi-morbidity in the Greater Accra Region, Ghana: to understand the complexity of their health needs due to multi-morbidity, and to document how the health system has responded. Guided by the Cumulative Complexity Model,
and using stratified purposive sampling, 20 in-depth interviews were conducted between May and September 2015 across three polyclinics in the Greater Accra Region. The data were analysed using the six phases of Thematic Analysis. Overall four themes emerged: 1) the influences on patients’ health experience; 2) seeking care and the responsiveness of the health care system; 3) how patients manage health care demands; and 4) outcomes due to health. Spirituality and the stigmatization caused by specific conditions, such as HIV, impacted their overall health experience. Women depended on the care and treatment provided through the health care system despite inconsistent coverage and a lack of choice
thereof, although their experiences varied by chronic condition. Women depended on their family and community to offset the financial burden of treatment costs, which was exacerbated by having many conditions. The implications are that integrated health and social support, such as streamlining
procedures and professional training on managing complexity, would benefit and reduce the burden of multi-morbidity experienced by women with multi-morbidity in Ghana.
0021-9320
Morgan, Sara
8ad10b7e-2005-4e93-9948-164a69489350
Eyles, Caroline
f8518cbb-669f-4cf6-bacb-4a174e385483
Roderick, Paul
dbb3cd11-4c51-4844-982b-0eb30ad5085a
Adongo, Philip
27f3ad19-0bd7-4196-a47a-33b1e6763b50
Hill, A. G.
5b17aa71-0c14-4fbf-8bc9-807c8294d4ae
Morgan, Sara
8ad10b7e-2005-4e93-9948-164a69489350
Eyles, Caroline
f8518cbb-669f-4cf6-bacb-4a174e385483
Roderick, Paul
dbb3cd11-4c51-4844-982b-0eb30ad5085a
Adongo, Philip
27f3ad19-0bd7-4196-a47a-33b1e6763b50
Hill, A. G.
5b17aa71-0c14-4fbf-8bc9-807c8294d4ae

Morgan, Sara, Eyles, Caroline, Roderick, Paul, Adongo, Philip and Hill, A. G. (2018) Women living with multi-morbidity in the Greater Accra region of Ghana: a qualitative study guided by the Cumulative Complexity Model. Journal of Biosocial Science. (doi:10.1017/S0021932018000342).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Defined as the co-occurrence of more than two chronic conditions, multi-morbidity has been described as a significant health care problem: a trend linked to a rise in non-communicable disease and an ageing population. Evidence on the experiences of living with multi-morbidity in middle-income countries (MICs) is limited. In high-income countries (HICs), multi-morbidity has a complex impact on health outcomes, including functional status, disability and quality of life, complexity of health care and burden of treatment. Previous evidence also shows that multi-morbidity is consistently higher amongst women.
This study aimed to explore the perceptions and experiences of women living with multi-morbidity in the Greater Accra Region, Ghana: to understand the complexity of their health needs due to multi-morbidity, and to document how the health system has responded. Guided by the Cumulative Complexity Model,
and using stratified purposive sampling, 20 in-depth interviews were conducted between May and September 2015 across three polyclinics in the Greater Accra Region. The data were analysed using the six phases of Thematic Analysis. Overall four themes emerged: 1) the influences on patients’ health experience; 2) seeking care and the responsiveness of the health care system; 3) how patients manage health care demands; and 4) outcomes due to health. Spirituality and the stigmatization caused by specific conditions, such as HIV, impacted their overall health experience. Women depended on the care and treatment provided through the health care system despite inconsistent coverage and a lack of choice
thereof, although their experiences varied by chronic condition. Women depended on their family and community to offset the financial burden of treatment costs, which was exacerbated by having many conditions. The implications are that integrated health and social support, such as streamlining
procedures and professional training on managing complexity, would benefit and reduce the burden of multi-morbidity experienced by women with multi-morbidity in Ghana.

Text
Manuscript_multimorbidity_021018_cleaned - Accepted Manuscript
Download (65kB)
Text
women_living_with_multimorbidity_in_the_greater_accra_region_of_ghana_a_qualitative_study_guided_by_the_cumulative_complexity_model - Version of Record
Restricted to Repository staff only
Request a copy
Text
Living with Multimorbidity in Ghana: A Qualitative Study Guided By The Cumulative Complexity Model - Proof
Restricted to Repository staff only
Request a copy
Slideshow
figure_1
Restricted to Repository staff only
Request a copy
Slideshow
figure_2
Restricted to Repository staff only
Request a copy
Slideshow
figure_3
Restricted to Repository staff only
Request a copy

Show all 6 downloads.

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 17 October 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 26 November 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 426635
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/426635
ISSN: 0021-9320
PURE UUID: af469a1f-09dc-43db-a2ee-ce2be7e98529
ORCID for Paul Roderick: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-9475-6850
ORCID for A. G. Hill: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4418-0379

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 06 Dec 2018 17:30
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 05:49

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Sara Morgan
Author: Caroline Eyles
Author: Paul Roderick ORCID iD
Author: Philip Adongo
Author: A. G. Hill ORCID iD

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×